Orlando Bloom to Lead Tracy Letts’ Killer Joe in the West End

first_img View Comments Stage-and-screen star Orlando Bloom will return to the West End this spring, taking on the central role of Joe Cooper in a new production of Tony and Pulitzer winner Tracy Letts’ dark comedy Killer Joe. Directed by Simon Evans, the production will begin preview performances at Trafalgar Studio 1 on May 18 with an opening scheduled for June 4.Orlando Bloom said, “I’m always looking for an opportunity to get back on stage, especially in London, the heart of my home. Tracy Letts’ Killer Joe is an incredible, adrenaline-fueled piece of writing, with a dark and gritty character to play. It’s an interesting comment on a disenfranchised view of the American dream.”In Killer Joe, the Smith family hatches a plan to murder their estranged matriarch for her insurance money. They hire Joe Cooper (Bloom), a police detective and part-time contract killer, to do the job. But once he enters their trailer home and comes face to face with their innocent daughter, the plan spirals out of control.Orlando Bloom made his West End stage debut in In Celebration and his Broadway debut in Romeo and Juliet. His screen credits include Pirates of the Caribbean, The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit.Additional casting for Killer Joe will be announced at a later date. The play will run for a limited 13-week engagement through August 18. Orlando Bloom(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser)last_img read more

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Three elected to the Board of Governors

first_imgThree elected to the Board of Governors Three elected to the Board of Governors One incumbent and two newcomers have been elected to The Florida Bar’s Board of Governors.In the three board races decided in the March balloting:• Incumbent Scott R. McMillen turned back a challenge from Patrick T. Christiansen by a vote of 786 to 562 in the Ninth Circuit, Seat 3, race.• O. John Alpizar defeated Roshani Mala Gunewardene 595 to 101 to represent the 18th Circuit, Seat 1 race.• Marcy L. Shaw, with 404 votes, won a four-way race against Luis E. Insignares, 231, Matthew Alan Linde, 105, and Tracey Dew-rell, 18, in the 20th Circuit, Seat 2, race.The 20th Circuit contest was to fill an unexpired term and Shaw begins service immediately. McMillen and Alpizar will be sworn in for full terms at the Bar Annual Convention in June.In balloting for the Young Lawyers Division Board of Governors:• Christian P. George defeated Michael E. Lockamy 158 to 71 in the YLD Fourth Circuit, Seat 1, race.• Andrew B. Pickett bested Vera L. June 113 to 28 in the YLD 18th Circuit, Seat 1, race.• Ben Gibson and Jennifer Shoaf Richardson will face each other on an April runoff ballot for Seat 1 in the Second Circuit. Gibson received 111 votes, or 49.78 percent, and Richardson 85 in the three-way race. They were followed by Joshua D. Zelman with 27 votes.Ballots for the runoff will be mailed around April 1. They must be returned to the Bar’s election company no later than 11:59 p.m. on April 23. The mailed ballots will contain instructions for voting with the enclosed paper ballot or for casting a vote online. See the candidates’ platform statements .In all, 49 percent of the votes were cast electronically and 51 percent were returned by mail.center_img April 1, 2012 Regular Newslast_img read more

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City support Kick It Out campaign

first_imgFor the last 25 years, the organisation has been at the heart of the drive towards equality, inclusion and cohesion for everyone who plays, watches or works in football. But the high-profile incidents that have marred football this season prove the sport needs an organisation like Kick It Out now more than ever.Having started as ‘Let’s Kick Racism Out of Football’ in 1993, Kick It Out has evolved into an organisation which – working alongside its partners The FA, the Premier League, the English Football League, The Professional Footballers’ Association, the League Managers Association and the Football Supporters’ Federation, among others – fights ALL forms of discrimination in the game we love.Since its inception, Kick It Out has provided a clear, independent voice within the game to challenge discrimination and exclusion, as well as education for professional players, clubs, fans, grassroots organisations and beyond. The organisation also provides mentoring and guidance to help underrepresented groups participate in football and secure opportunities to develop a career in the game.Kick It Out has established an equality framework for professional clubs, supporting the development of equality practices and policies, and enabled more effective reporting and investigating of complaints of discriminatory abuse through its pioneering reporting app.However, despite 25 years of progress, hatred, prejudice, abuse and discrimination are still evident in our society and in football.In the 2018/19 season and beyond, we want everyone involved in football to continue to campaign for equality and challenge discrimination, while playing a part in shaping a fair and inclusive future for everyone who loves the game.But don’t forget to recognise how far we’ve come. Let’s kick racism and discrimination out of football – together.You can report discrimination to Kick It Out via their app, via email on [email protected], via their online reporting form on their website, or via freephone on 0800 169 9414.Keep up to date with the organisation’s work at the following:Twitter: @kickitout Facebook: @kickitoutofficial           Instagram: @kickitout             Website: www.kickitout.orglast_img read more

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Our nation’s electricity supply greatly improved under Jagan, PPP/C (Part 1)

first_imgDear Editor,I write this letter responding to the editorial entitled “GPL” in the Sunday Stabroek of November 12. It seems to me that the Editor set out not wanting to appear to be on either side, neither the PPP/C nor the PNC/APNU&AFC Coalition, thus he used a broad brush which obscured significant details with the risk that we would miss some important lessons, much of which we have paid for and continue to pay for in adverse experiences and in much frustrations.In the SN editorial, there is a reference to 1978, no doubt recalling that nearly three-day period when Georgetown and its environs were without electricity and water – perhaps the lowest point in our supply of electricity. There was not much recovery 14 years later when Dr Cheddi Jagan and the PPP/C entered office in October 1992. I could not concur more with the Editor when he says, “Then came President Cheddi Jagan who in the early days of his period of office which happened to coincide with a particularly bleak period of electricity crisis” – accurate to this point but demonstrably inaccurate in the latter part of this sentence – “seemed to be absorbing himself with promulgating the New Global Human Order, rather than fixing GEC (Guyana Electricity Corporation), as it then was.”.The last part of that sentence could not be more wrong: our electricity utility was extremely close to Cheddi’s heart and he spoke many times of how during his 1957-1964 period as Chief Minister/Premier, his Government accepted the offer to purchase the then Demerara Electricity Company as the shareholders decided to get out of that business. Cheddi couldn’t help repeating time and again how well the utility was run then with the person he selected, a tailor, as Chairman. By all accounts the electricity supply was satisfying unto our days of strife and strikes and turmoil (1962 to 64) which eventually pushed Cheddi from office.Cheddi returned to office (in 1992) with tremendous zeal to return GEC to creditable performance. As would have been known at the time, Cheddi and our new PPP/C Government were under great pressure from the MFIs (Multilateral Financial Institutions) and Bilateral Relationships to immediately and totally privatise the provision of electricity in Guyana. Cheddi led the arguments that immediate privatisation to foreign buyer(s) would be precipitate and premature – there was much for us, the populace, to learn and much for us to correct and change before seeking a privatisation that would not be a giveaway but a reasonable business transaction. Cheddi called for a degree of initial improvements by our own means before going to privatisation. Guyana was not agreeing to the privatisation of our electricity utility as a total basket case.Cheddi was continually involved, unlike the Editor – some may say too much, as it took Cheddi’s understanding and personal standing to lead our country in many new directions, including restoring our electricity utility. It required significant reordering of our nation’s priorities, an even-handed frugality with a tight rein on spending for Cheddi and the PPP/C to turn things around in our country. By squeezing all around, enough money was mustered to fund our first expansion in generation of 11 MW when GEC at the time had a notional supply of 30 MW. We advertised publicly for proposals. More than a dozen offered reconditioned gensets, but we thought that since reliability was most critical we would prefer brand-new units. The Wärtsilä offer was the lowest of brand-new units (quite possibly Wärtsilä had foregone any profits in that offer, as an investment to get their foot into Guyana), but the Wärtsilä brand and performance were then unknown in Guyana. As it happened, Dr Jagan at Omai for its opening, when touring their Wärtsilä power plant, received such complimentary remarks about Wärtsilä, he recommended that we consider Wärtsilä’s price and performance guarantee as credible. To pre-empt any compromise of Wärtsilä’s guarantees and its performance, I advocated and sought approvals (on both sides) for an operations and maintenance contract between GEC and Wärtsilä. I admit it was my “cya” strategy.The two units brought tremendous improvement, but we knew that many more were needed, and quickly so. With this example establishing costs and benefits, we, Cheddi with the PPP/C, spent some months trying to promote local funding of the next tranches of gensets. Not enough of us Guyanese seemed ready to believe that we Guyanese were ready to do what was required to develop an efficient, respectable, profitable utility on our own. As I recall, it was only a few days after our Government eventually ordered a second tranche of two Wärtsilä units that a large failure at the steam plant at Kingston prompted the immediate ordering of an additional four units to follow on. Unfortunately, Cheddi passed away before the last four were brought into service.Cheddi had also been receiving representations to replace the almost totally dead plant at Anna Regina on the Essequibo Coast. He had the pleasure of commissioning a brand new 4 MW (2 x 2MW) plant in May 1995.Mr Editor, it was Cheddi, who – after many long meetings, the experiences referred to above, and the obvious needs for inputs of capital, new, additional and different experiences and expertise – eventually acceded to starting on the road to privatising the GEC for the development of Guyana and its people. Notwithstanding our reluctance to consider recovering our GEC ourselves, the overwhelming number of us Guyanese seemed concerned about our GEC (now GPL) in foreign hands. I recall a few days before he took ill a number of Guyanese persons were trying to persuade Cheddi not to privatise. His answer essentially was, bring me and bring me quickly a credible alternative to privatisation. It would take about two years after Cheddi’s passing for the GPL privatisation to be completed, but the agreements bore his imprint – a 50:50 partnership and both the Government and Core-Partner selling down their shareholding over years ten to twenty. Cheddi’s dream was for every Guyanese customer family to acquire about the same number of shares, and thus being at the same time both owner as well as customer, sensing, resolving and reconciling the contradictions of the two roles.Sincerely,Samuel AA HindsFormer Prime Minister, former President and former Minister Responsible for Energy and Electricitylast_img read more

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