College students who binge drink have more delayed sleep timing

first_imgShare on Facebook The research abstract was published recently in an online supplement of the journal Sleep and was presented Wednesday, June 10, in Seattle, Washington, at SLEEP 2015, the 29th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC.The study group comprised 878 students. The mean age was 18 and 57 percent were female. Students completed a Phase 1 survey in spring before fall college enrollment (high school) and submitted online daily sleep and drink diaries from day 1 of college. Any indication of alcohol use from Phase 1 measures was assigned positive for pre-collegiate drinking. From daily diary, male binge assignment was equal to five or more alcoholic drinks on one day; female binge drinking was equal to four or more. Three groups were derived from those negative for high school drinking: none equal to no college drinking; some equal to drinking one binge day or less and heavy equal to more than one binge day. A fourth group (drinker) included students that were positive for drinking in high school who reported more than one binge event in college. Pinterest Email A new study suggests that students who initiate and/or continue drinking and engage in binge drinking in college have more delayed sleep timing and more variable sleep schedules.Results show that heavier drinkers had later bedtimes and rise times, and more day-to-day variability in sleep length, bedtime and rise time.“These data indicate that students who initiate drinking and engage in binge drinking in college have more delayed sleep timing and a greater mismatch between circadian phase and sleep timing,” said lead author Eliza Van Reen, assistant professor, department of psychiatry and human behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, R.I.center_img LinkedIn Share on Twitter Sharelast_img read more

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“K” Line ships emergency vehicles to El Salvador

first_imgEl Salvador has long been faced with a shortage of fire engines, having only 19 units in the whole nation. Recognising such a situation, Fujisawa-city decided to donate a ambulance and fire engine to El Salvador, which were loaded onto “K” Line’s pure car carriers (PCCs) at Yokohama. Pictured in front of the fire engine are (l-r): Kunio Okumura, assistant to honorary consul of El Salvador in Japan, “K” Line; Martha Lidia Zelayandia, ambassador to Japan, Republic of El Salvador; Koichiro Hara, representative director, Fulltime System. www.kline.co.jp/enlast_img read more

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Gus Malzahn: ‘I know our fans are disappointed’

first_img Session ID: 2020-09-18:23c57e241607c42f83d2a51a Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-936197-4512423171001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn talks to his players during the NCAA football game between Auburn and Mississippi State on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2015, at Jordan-Hare Stadium in Auburn, Ala. Mississippi State Bulldogs defeated Auburn 17-9. Albert Cesare / AdvertiserAuburn head coach Gus Malzahn talks to his players during the NCAA football game between Auburn and Mississippi State on Saturday, Sept. 26, 2015, at Jordan-Hare Stadium in Auburn, Ala. Mississippi State Bulldogs defeated Auburn 17-9. Albert Cesare / AdvertiserAUBURN – Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn is feeling the displeasure from a fan base that certainly expected more than a 0-2 start to Southeastern Conference.“We are disappointed we didn’t win and I know our fans are disappointed,” Malzahn said Monday night on his ‘Tiger Talk’ radio show.In just under a month, Auburn (2-2, 0-2 in SEC) has gone from a preseason national championship contender to an unranked program for the first time in over 750 days.Instead of trying to produce visions of a repeat of the 2013 season, Malzahn spent the opening moments of his weekly radio trying to convince fans that a repeat of last year’s collapse wouldn’t happen.“We have to get back to that level,” Malzahn said Monday night. “Last year, we lost a tough one against A&M and never really rebounded like we wanted to. This year, we talked about inexperience on offense.”Auburn is now going back to the preseason marketing phrase of ‘Count on me’ to make sure a repeat of the disastrous 2012 season that ended without a conference victory.“Our slogan is count on me and I think we really have to put that in play now,” Auburn receiver Marcus Davis said. “For the most part we’ve got a good group of leaders that will do their best to keep the attitude right around here. I think we’ll be in a good position to move forward.”The 17-9 loss to Mississippi State Saturday marked the first time that a college program with Gus Malzahn coaching on the sidelines failed to score a touchdown. Malzahn lamented that the problems on offense were the culprit of making the early-season quarterback change to Sean White from Jeremy Johnson.“We did know we were going to go through some growing pains offensively,” Malzahn said. “Anytime you make a quarterback change and the transition that goes with that. It’s unfortunate that the mistakes were pretty critical and influenced the game.”Malzahn didn’t attempt to hide the crushing element of the loss saying “we should be disappointed” Saturday ending the hopes of winning the SEC West after expectations around the program were so high in the preseason.“There are definitely some things we can build upon,” Malzahn said. “Obviously, we are disappointed to lose at home. Our crowd was unbelievable. The big problem was our offense couldn’t respond.”Saturday night’s loss marks only the third time Auburn has started 0-2 in SEC play since 1980. In the two previous years (1980 and 2012) Auburn finished with losing overall records, no bowl berth and new head coaches the next season.“From a coaching standpoint, we know we’re going to get better,” Malzahn said. “I think we know preseason rankings really don’t matter until halfway through the year.”Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUNDlast_img read more

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Arkansas’ Williams to return for senior season

first_imgFAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Jonathan Williams wasn’t quite ready to end his time at Arkansas.The standout running back said Wednesday that he’s returning for his senior season. He leads Arkansas (6-6) with 1,085 yards rushing this season.Williams helped the Razorbacks rebound from a 3-9 record last year to reach their first bowl game in three seasons. He had said leading into Texas Bowl against Texas that he would wait until hearing back from the NFL on his draft prospects before deciding whether to leave school, and he wasted little time in making that decision.”My faith, family and education are very important to me and all three played a major role in my decision,” Williams said. “I have many goals that I want to pursue, on and off the field. Graduating from the University of Arkansas is very important to me, and I look forward to running through the ‘A’ again in 2015.”Williams and Arkansas’ Alex Collins each topped the 1,000-yard rushing mark this season, the only teammates in major college football to do so during the regular season. The Texas native has 2,216 yards rushing in three seasons for the Razorbacks and was fourth in the Southeastern Conference in rushing this season.Williams has 11 rushing touchdowns this season, including four in a 145-yard rushing effort in a blowout win over Texas Tech. He later added a career-best 153 yards rushing against Alabama-Birmingham.Williams was a backup to current Kansas City Chiefs running back Knile Davis as a freshman in 2012. He had 900 yards rushing on 150 carries, a 6.0-yard average, last season while splitting time with Collins — a mark he topped this season in Arkansas coach Bret Bielema’s second season.”I’m always excited for players to chase NFL dreams,” Bielema said. “For Jonathan, that meant another year of growth on and off the field and a degree to carry him through life. I’m excited to have him here for another year that will help take him to new heights.”The Texas Bowl is Monday night.last_img read more

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Loving Rev Fred Phelps

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 SharesMarch 20, 2014; Washington Post Could you love a man who wrote this?“We told you, right after it happened five years ago, that the deadly events of 9/11 were direct outpourings of divine retribution, the immediate visitation of God’s wrath and vengeance and punishment for America’s horrendous sodomite sins, that worse and more of it was on the way. We further told you that any politician, any political official, any preacher telling you differently as to the cause and interpretation of 9/11 is a dastardly lying false prophet, cowardly and mean, and headed for hell. And taking you with him! God is no longer with America, but is now America’s enemy. God himself is now America’s terrorist.”—Fred Phelps, “9/11: God’s Wrath Revealed,” Sept. 8, 2006.This article by Steven Petrow for the Washington Post provides a little grist for reflection for those of us wondering how to react to the news of the death of Rev. Fred Phelps of the Westboro Baptist Church. Petrow points to the question being asked on Twitter: Might the death of this miserably hate-filled 83-year-old be a cause for celebration?Phelps is known for his soul-assaulting protests at military funerals for purposes of “opposing the homosexual lifestyle of soul-damning, nation-destroying filth,” as well as the existence among us of Jews and Catholics, among others. In Phelps’ view, the death of young men and women in war and terrorism was God’s way of punishing the United States for its tolerance (such as it was) of gay rights. The church traveled hundreds of miles to picket mourning families with signs that inconceivably read “Thank God for Dead Soldiers” and “Thank God for 9/11.”As Petrow recalls, however, the public first noticed Westboro Baptist when it picketed the funeral of Matthew Shepard who was beaten to death in what many believe to have been a hate crime. The signs for that event read “Fags are nature freaks,” “Matt in Hell,” and “God Hates Fags.”But Petrow points out that when Shepard’s mother, Judy Shepard, was asked about Phelps a few years ago, she responded, “Oh we love Freddy. If it wasn’t for him, there would be no Matthew Shepard.” By which, we assume, that his death would have been less noticed and less impactful, less responsible for the change that was to follow.Now, some are suggesting that it would be fair play to picket his funeral, but Petrow suggests this is the wrong approach.“Instead, what if those on the receiving end of Phelps’s ideology did the opposite, which is to say, let him go quietly—and without protest—into that good night?… Revenge against Phelps—or, frankly, any hateful or toxic person—doesn’t really allow for healing. Joseph Burgo, a psychoanalyst and an author, told me this week: ‘For those of us who have felt hated and shamed by people like Phelps, the temptation is to turn tables and triumph over their demise. You might think of it as “giving back” the hatred and shame that was inflicted upon us, but this reaction binds us to the other person as long as we continue to feel that way.’ He then added that we need ‘to break the hold of these destructive emotions and move on.’”“So,” says Petrow, “with Phelps’s passing, I suggest we bombard Westboro Baptist with sympathy cards and prayers. Or, as a friend of mine tells me: ‘Drive your enemies really crazy: Love them.’ Okay, maybe not love, but at least not hate. Never hate.”—Ruth McCambridgeShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

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