Phish ‘Dinner And A Movie’ Stream Companion: Hampton Coliseum 10/20/13 [Video]

first_imgTonight (Tuesday, July 21st), Phish will air their memorable performance at the iconic Hampton Coliseum on October 20th, 2013 as the seventeenth episode of their ongoing archival webcast/cooking series, Dinner and a Movie. Tune in below at 8:30 p.m. ET and scroll down to follow along with our 10/20/13 Stream Companion.Phish Dinner and a Movie Episode 17: 10/20/13, Hampton Coliseum [Full Show]The seventeenth episode of Dinner and a Movie follows the 8/31/12 “F— Your Face” show, the 7/27/14 Merriweather “Tweezerfest”, the 7/25/17’s Baker’s Dozen “Jam-Filled” night, Magnaball night two (8/22/15), last year’s first night at Mohegan Sun (7/9/19), the first night of the band’s 2016 Halloween run in Las Vegas (10/28/16), the final night of 2017’s Mexican destination event (1/15/17), the band’s first of three nights in Alpharetta, GA in 2018 (8/3/18), the out-there 1997 U.S. tour opener featuring a guest appearance by LeRoi Moore of Dave Matthews Band (7/21/97), the improv-heavy second night of their 2018 Madison Square Garden New Year’s run (12/29/18), 2013’s Friday night at The Gorge (7/26/13), the band’s 1995 debut at Deer Creek Music Center (6/19/95), the fiery Wednesday night at The Mann in 2015 (8/12/15), an evening at the iconic Greek Theatre in Berkeley, CA from 2010 (8/7/10), and an “avant-garde” set two video from Northampton, MA back in 1989 (5/1/89), and 2019’s wild Alpine Valley finale (7/14/19). You can often gauge the energy in the room at a Phish show by how long the band sits back and basks in that mid-song respite. The 2.5-minute runtime of this interlude reflected the electricity of that moment of connectedness between the four men onstage and the thousands in the audience, still just as glad to see Phish back at Hampton four years later. After finishing the song and taking a moment to deliberate, the band opted for a set-closing cover of Jimi Hendrix‘s “Bold As Love”, sung with gusto by the Chairman of the Boards.While this first set is nothing to thumb your nose at, the second set on 10/20/13 was what put this performance in the conversation for “Show of the Year.” When the band stepped back onstage for set two, Trey stepped to the mic to address a group of fans in the crowd. “Are you guys, like, in jail stripes,” he asked, “Or are you Waldo?” When the crowd roared back, “Waldo!” Trey let out a sigh. “Ah, we thought you were in jail stripes, so we were gonna play a song for you.” Then, pointing to the back of the arena, where a “Paul and Silas” sign had been hanging over the balcony all weekend, he added, “We’ll play it anyway, we’ll play it for those guys.” With that, the band opened set two with “Paul and Silas”, the traditional gospel tune about the two biblical prisoners saved by their faith. As always, the rule rang true: The best way to get your request played is to request songs the band wants to play.The brief moment of crowd banter ahead of “Paul and Silas” proved to be the only pause for the rest of the set, as Phish got down to business with a pair of fantastic, stylistically wide-ranging jams on “Tweezer” and “Golden Age”, together clocking in at more than 41 minutes of thrilling improvisation.With the band feeling loose, cohesive, and creative, the “Piper” that followed seemed destined to follow in the path of the two Type II behemoths that preceded it. Instead, at the 7-minute mark, that creativity took the band in a different, seemingly unexpected direction. After locking into boogieing rock groove, the band rode that thought seamlessly into a cover of Bachman-Turner Overdrive‘s 1973 smash, “Takin’ Care Of Business”.Despite how well the two seemed to fit together here, “Piper” > “Takin’ Care Of Business” isn’t a common Phish pairing. Before this moment, “Takin’ Care Of Business” wasn’t even part of the band’s repertoire. Was it rough? Sure, but it was hot. At the time, some fans wondered if the new cover may be a clue about the surprise “Costume Set” on Halloween night in Atlantic City [Spoiler Alert: They were wrong… Wingsuit’d].Whether they planned the pairing before they stepped onstage or simply found themselves in that progression and collectively decided to run with it, this organic debut is the sort of thing that keeps fans coming back again and again, year after year.As “TCoB” wound down, a funky “2001” rose from the vapors to keep Hampton dancing, and the funk continued full-force from there into and ominous “Sand”. Finally, with time for one more, the band shifted from demonic to angelic for a stellar, set-closing “Slave To The Traffic Light”.Much like the first set ended, the encore began with a fan-favorite classic rock cover as sung by Page McConnell—this time, The Beatles‘ “A Day In The Life”—before closing out the show and the weekend with the emphatic punctuation known as “Tweezer Reprise”.Grab a ticket off the tree and tune in tonight at 8:30 p.m. ET to relive 10/20/13 at The Mothership.Setlist: Phish | Hampton Coliseum | Hampton, VA | 10/20/13SET 1: Julius, Funky Bitch, Back on the Train, Roses Are Free > Sample in a Jar, Ginseng Sullivan, 46 Days, Divided Sky, Bold As LoveSET 2: Paul and Silas > Tweezer > Golden Age[1] > Piper -> Takin’ Care of Business[2] > Also Sprach Zarathustra > Sand > Slave to the Traffic LightENCORE: A Day in the Life > Tweezer Reprise[1] Fish on Marimba Lumina.[2] Phish debut.Back on the Train contained a Jean Pierre tease from Trey. Golden Age featured Fish on Marimba Lumina. This show featured the Phish debut of Takin’ Care of Business. This week’s Dinner and a Movie takes us back to the opening run of the band’s 2013 Fall Tour. Of course, the narrative among fans leading into this three-night run was less about the start of the tour and more about a triumphant return: These three shows marked Phish’s first return to Hampton Coliseum—”The Mothership”—since the return. While it would be tough to top the emotion of the band’s 2009 reunion shows at the Virginia arena after a 5-year “breakup,” the fact that Phish was back at Hampton for three nights was enough to push fan excitement for this run to a boiling point.The difference between the ’09 reunion run at Hampton and the ’13 reprisal was apparent as soon as you hit the lot. While the ’09 Hampton lot was flooded with ticketless hopefuls waving fistfuls of cash and a finger in the air, the Hampton 2013 scene was awash with extras. Literal “ticket trees” dotted the lots, with extras tickets tucked under pieces of bark, ripe for the picking.While the demand for Hampton tickets may have flipped from ’09 to ’13, the band’s track record for delivering memorable performances at The Mothership held as true as ever. The first two nights of the run were solid, but the third night, Sunday, October 20th—the show we’ll revisit this evening—blew them both away and set a high bar for the remainder of the year.The band hit the stage with pep in their steps to kick off the show, nailing a string of upbeat selections including “Julius”, “Funky Bitch” (Son Seals), and “Back On The Train”. A hint of exploratory jamming on the always-welcome cover of Ween‘s “Roses Are Free” kept the GA crowd on its toes before the sing-along train kept chugging with “Sample In A Jar”, “Ginseng Sullivan”, and a brief but hearty “46 Days”.The undeniable highlight of set one followed, as the band delivered a sublime rendition of “Divided Sky”. Though played to virtual perfection, the takeaway from this version of the classic Phish composition would be the “pause,” as the entire arena raised their lighters amidst a delirious chorus of cheers. Following a somewhat-unsuccessful fan campaign on various Internet forums to get fans to raise their lighters during setbreak the previous night, the stars finally aligned during this “Divided Sky”. With the idea already planted in fans’ heads, many were quick to meet the composed break in the music with a flame held skyward. Those who hadn’t heard quickly followed suit, leading to a powerful scene to behold. Get a taste below:Phish – “Divided Sky” Pause Lighters at Hampton 2013last_img read more

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As global COVID-19 total passes 850,000, study shows 1.4% fatality rate

first_imgA steady surge of COVID-19 activity on many continents pushed the global pandemic total past 850,000 infections today and sent the number of deaths over 41,000.In research developments, a team from the United Kingdom published a new case-fatality rate estimate of 1.4%, based on all available data on deaths in and outside of China, and another group found that illness rates in South Korea trended younger and more female compared with patterns seen in China’s outbreak.The latest global total stands at 850,583 cases from 180 countries, with 41,654 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins online dashboard.French cases, deaths surgeIn Europe today, France reported 7,578 new cases, sharply higher than the 4,375 new cases it reported yesterday, bringing the total to 52,128. Health officials also reported 499 more deaths, which increased the country’s fatality count to 3,523, making it the fourth country to pass China’s death toll.Italy reported 4,053 more cases, similar to its total of new cases yesterday, boosting its total to 105,792 cases. It also added 837 more deaths, raising its fatality number to 12,428.Elsewhere in Europe, the United Kingdom today reported 3,009 more cases, along with 381 more deaths. And Turkey reported 2,704 cases, up dramatically from the 1,610 it reported yesterday. So far, the country has reported 168 deaths.In a related research development today, a new report from modeling experts at Imperial College London estimates that nonpharmaceutical interventions such as social distancing as of today have saved 59,000 lives.Other global developmentsElsewhere in the world, some countries such as Iran are reported a steady stream of new cases and deaths, while others—such as Indian and the Philippines—are seeing accelerating activity. Still others are working to prevent a resurgence.Iran today reported 3,110 new cases and 141 new deaths, putting its respective totals at 44,605 and 2,898.The Philippines reported 538 new cases today, up sharply from the 128 it reported yesterday, lifting its total to 2,084, with 88 deaths.In India, where pandemic activity is picking up steam and migrant workers and other groups are struggling with the effects of the country’s new lockdown, health officials reported 146 new cases, for a total of 1,397.In Asia, Japan today confirmed 87 more cases, 20 of them from airport quarantine, raising its total to 1,953 according to the country’s health ministry. Japan’s COVID-19 cases have risen slower than other countries, but it has been experiencing an uptick in cases in the Tokyo area.South Korea today reported 125 more cases, lifting its total to 9,786, according an update from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of those, 29 were imported cases, mostly from Europe or the United States. Most international travelers are now required to self-quarantine before entering the country.Singapore today reported 47 new cases today, 16 of them imported, and Hong Kong reported 32 new cases, 24 of them with a travel history.New fatality rate estimatesIn research developments today, scientists from the MRC Center for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College London estimated that symptom onset to death is 18 days and that the case-fatality rate (CFR) in and outside of China is 1.4%, but declined to 0.66 after adjusting for undiagnosed cases. The team, which based its findings on case data from people who died from COVID-19, published its findings yesterday in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.The hospitalization rate was 8.2% for people in their 50s, but rose to 18.4% for people ages 80 and older.In a related commentary in the same issue, Shigui Ruan, PhD, with the mathematics department at the University of Miami in Florida, wrote that estimating the CFR in real time is challenging, but it’s an important piece of information to guide the outbreak response. He added that estimates might vary country to country based on several factors, including differences in prevention, control, preparedness, healthcare availability, and mitigation policies, and because the CFR is substantially affected by the preparedness and availability of healthcare.Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, said one problem with the study’s conclusions is that it doesn’t factor in comorbidity risk factors, especially obesity, which is rare in China but much more common in the United States, where 45% of men and woman are moderately to severely obese.He said his conversations with medical colleagues in New York City reveal that the number one risk factor for severe disease and death there is obesity. Osterholm is directory of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), which publishes CIDRAP News.The study’s authors acknowledge that reality. They write, “Mortality can also be expected to vary with the underlying health of specific populations, given that the risks associated with COVID-19 will be heavily influenced by the presence of underlying comorbidities.”Different infection patterns in KoreaIn the other study, researchers from the United States and Korea found differences in illness and death patterns by age and gender when they compared data from South Korea with data from China. They published their findings today in Clinical Infectious Diseases.In China, illness levels were greatest in people ages 50 to 59, but in South Korea, illnesses showed peaks in two different groups: they were highest in those ages 20 to 29 and second-highest in those ages 50 to 59. China’s cases trended slightly male, while South Korea’s patients were female by a 2:1 ratio. The CFR in South Korean males, however, was twice as high as in female Korean patients.The researchers said the younger tilt in South Korea’s cases may reflect lower rates of physical distancing and compliance with quarantine measures in younger people.last_img read more

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VIDEO: Boxing Day Clash Excites Woodward

first_imgThe full back spoke to gathered media ahead of the much anticipated Aviva Premiership clash in Round Eleven.Subscribe to Bristol Rugby TV by clicking here.last_img

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EMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: HOW OUR DIETING AFFECTS OUR CHILDREN

first_imgBY EMMET RUSHE: Last Friday I put up a picture and a short post on my Facebook page about how constant dieting can affect our children’s behaviour towards food and their body.Over the weekend I kept going back to that post. Something about it bothered me. It was like an itch that I couldn’t scratch.As I sat down at my computer on Sunday night, ready to write another article, I found myself still thinking about that image. The little girl, still in nappies, stands on a set of scales, just like she sees her Mammy or Daddy do. The short post wasn’t enough, I need to expand on what I think is a huge issue.Everywhere we go we are met with weight loss – in shops, on television, in magazines, advertisements on the radio, on Facebook and Twitter – absolutely everywhere. The message is always the same – We NEED to lose weight. Whether we need to or not is a completely different issue, but the media love to tell us how we could look and feel better, if only we lost a few pounds.Walking to the checkout in any shop, we are surrounded by magazines all berating the celebrity with wobbly bits and the next one celebrating the celebrity who lost 10lbs and how YOU CAN TOO! Just buy the magazine and see for yourself. We are constantly being reminded that we aren’t perfect.So we do. We try it and why not? Just look at the results that “so and so” got, using the diet to get ready for that film they did. We try it. It goes the way all diets go and eventually we give up and normal service resumes. It is estimated that 1 in 4 adults reading this will be on a diet and that they will attempt 4-5 diets per year.The question we have to ask is this:DO WE HONESTLY THINK THAT OUR CHILDREN WILL NOT PICK UP ON THIS?Every time we step on the scales, or complain about our weight or make a big show about not eating something because we are on a diet, our children are seeing and hearing everything. They are picking up on it, processing it and storing it. We are essentially moulding their outlooks on how they eat and how they will view their bodies in the future.The trouble is that the future is not that far away. A recent study done in the UK on more than 7000 13 year olds found that ‘overall, 63 percent of girls and 39 percent of boys were afraid of gaining weight or getting fat. Extreme levels of fear of weight gain or concerns about body shape or weight were seen among 11 percent of girls’It also found that these children were more likely to have weight problems by the age of 15.The media has a lot of influence on how we go about our day to day lives. We are heavily influenced by what we see and read day to day. Unfortunately, so are our children.We have to take responsibility for our actions. We cannot expect our children to have healthy attitudes towards food and their bodies if we do not. Stop dieting. Start eating natural, non-processed whole food and start being more active. It really is that simple.#TrainSmartFor further information on Personal Training and Nutrition you can contact me through the link below.https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rushe-Personal-Training-and-Performance/120518884715118* Emmet is the owner and operator of Rushe Personal Training and Performance.EMMET RUSHE’S FITNESS COLUMN: HOW OUR DIETING AFFECTS OUR CHILDREN was last modified: February 16th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:childrenemmet rushefitness columnimageobesitypersonal trainerlast_img read more

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