Pedro Caixinha urges winning end to Rangers season

first_img“It has been hard on the pitch in terms of performances but it has been brilliant for me to play at this club, and to play in front of the fans has been a big highlight for me.“Obviously you are a little bit disappointed (at no deal) because when you play at such a big club you want it to last as long as possible.“But I have been in football long enough to know that when a new manager comes in they have different ideas, so I am just trying to enjoy every minute as if it’s my last.“I can only wish the club all the best and hopefully see them get back to the top sooner rather than later.” Pedro Caixinha saw his side defeat Hearts 2-1 at Ibrox and then said he wants maximum points in the remaining two matches of the season.Goals from Joe Garner and Barrie McKay earned three points against Hearts, who had Prince Bauben sent off in the first half. The Rangers duo scored for the second consecutive game and with a home match against Aberdeen and a trip to play St Johnstone still to come, Caixinha was in no doubt about what he wanted from the last week of the season.He said: “Win my friend. Win. “It is going to be the last working week before a short period of vacation and we return again. “The working week is ready. I am always working in advance and depending on what is going on, I make some changes after I analyse the game. But it is about winning.“We want to finish well and until the last moment they are here and I am here, we can think only about winning.”Veteran defender Clint Hill was a key player against Hearts but his time with Rangers is coming to an end after Caixinha decided against offering him a new contract. “I will be moving on unfortunately,” he said.last_img read more

Details

Biko at the Apartheid Museum

first_img23 January 2008Just over 30 years ago, on 12 September 1977, Stephen Bantu Biko died in police detention at the age of 31, leaving behind him a fundamentally altered political landscape and a liberating mirror for the black men and women of South Africa.The pioneer of the Black Consciousness philosophy was arrested on the outskirts of the Eastern Cape town of Grahamstown on 18 August 1977, and taken to apartheid security police headquarters in Port Elizabeth where, according to South African History Online, he “was beaten so severely that damage to his brain was caused.“Realising to a certain extent the seriousness of his condition, the police decided to transfer him to a prison hospital in Pretoria, which was 1 133 kilometres away. He died shortly after his arrival there.”To commemorate the 30th anniversary of his death, the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg has put together an excellent exhibition on Biko. Through about 50 panels filled with text and graphics, the viewer can read the words of Biko, taken from his book I Write What I Like.But there are also many other things to read about the man, and how he died a lonely death at the hands of the brutal security police. There is unique footage of Biko from a 1977 BBC interview; and then minister of police Jimmy Kruger’s infamous comment after Biko’s death:“I am not glad and I am not sorry about Mr Biko. His death leaves me cold. I can say nothing to you. Any person who dies . I shall also be sorry if I die .” Kruger said, laughing at his own joke.There is also footage of Kruger. Initially, the security police said that the cause of death was a hunger strike. Several months later, when it was acknowledged that Biko had died of brain damage, Kruger said dispassionately: “A man can damage his brain many ways. I have also felt like banging my head against a brick wall many times, but realising now, with the Biko autopsy, that may be fatal, I haven’t done it.”Born in King William’s TownBantu Steve Biko was born in King William’s Town in 1948, a tall, handsome man with a charismatic personality. He was a founder member of the South African Students’ Organisation, from which the Black Consciousness Movement developed, with the slogan “Black is beautiful”.Biko said in his book: “When you say ‘Black is beautiful’ you are saying, ‘Man, you are okay as you are; begin to look upon yourself as a human being.’”A number of umbrella organisations were formed, one of which was the Black People’s Convention, which played a role in the Soweto riots of 1976.In 1973, Biko was banned and confined to Eastern Cape. After the riots he was arrested repeatedly; by his final arrest on 18 August 1977 he had been in and out of jail frequently, including spending 101 days in solitary confinement.He was held naked and manacled at the Walmer police station in Port Elizabeth, says human rights advocate George Bizos in No One to Blame. On the morning of 6 September he was taken to the security police offices in the Sanlam Building and interrogated until 6pm, when he was again handcuffed and shackled.Long journey to PretoriaBiko was examined and transferred to the prison hospital; he was given a lumbar puncture, which revealed blood in his spinal fluid. It was decided to transfer him to Pretoria, a 1 133 kilometre journey that took 11 hours, with Biko lying naked in the back of the Land Rover. He died on 12 September 1977 in the Pretoria prison hospital later that night. He was just 31 years old.His death caused a worldwide outcry which temporarily stopped the deaths in detention, but they resumed a year to two later. In all, 115 people died in prison between 1963 and 1990.Biko’s wife, Ntsiki, says of his death in detention: “I think Steve expected to die in the hands of the security police. I think all of us expected it. But Steve was prepared to sacrifice his life for the black cause. He felt his work was so important that even if he died it would be worth it.”And Biko himself said of dying: “You are either alive and proud or you are dead, and when you are dead, you don’t care anyway. And your method of death can be a politicising thing.”Behind the iconThe exhibition traces Biko’s birth and education, his spells inside jail, his relationships, and his death in detention.There is a section, right at the top end of the exhibition, which, says curator Emilia Potenza, attempts to record details of others who died in detention. A video broadcasts images of them and their families, and any other details that researchers have managed to accumulate.Says Potenza: “It is an extraordinary story which moves beyond the icon on a T-shirt to what’s behind that icon.”Besides the repeated recordings of Biko and Kruger, the constant refrain of Peter Gabriel’s song, simply entitled Biko, first released in 1980, echoes hauntingly around the museum.The exhibition was put together at the request of the Department of Education, with assistance from the Steve Biko Foundation. It makes use of many original photographs, documents and audio-visual clips, and draws on interviews with a range of his contemporaries.It will travel around the country and go overseas, says Christopher Till, the museum’s director. “The Biko story is one that needs to be told. His philosophy has won over the minds of many. Many of the BC [Black Consciousness] ideas have triumphed.”The apartheid state, says Bizos, considered Biko dangerous “not because he had ever taken part in violent activities, but because of his formidable intellect.”The exhibition will run until the end of June 2008. The Apartheid Museum is on the corner of Northway and Gold Reef roads, Ormonde. It is open from Tuesdays to Sundays from 10am to 5pm.Source: City of Johannesburglast_img read more

Details

Weekly Wrap-up: The Death of Steve Jobs and More…

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts robyn tippins A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Tags:#community#web#Weekly Wrap-ups This week the internet said goodbye to the incomparableSteve Jobs. The staff of ReadWriteWeb covered some of his best moments, and his worst. Though he has passed on, his impact was large, and we will not soon forget Apple’s founder. RIP Steve.After the jump you’ll find more of this week’s top news stories on some of the key topics that are shaping the Web – Location, App Stores and Real-Time Web – plus highlights from some of our six channels. Read on for more.Top Stories of the WeekAt 56, Steve Jobs rocked our world, and his death was felt from Silicon Valley to Bahrain. Here are a few of our posts commemorating his life.Steve Jobs, 1955-2011What Steve Meant Back ThenA Great User Experience: The Web Legacy of Steve JobsFrom Silicon Valley to Bahrain, the Web Mourns Steve JobsSteve Jobs’ Legacy In the Pantheon of Great American Innovators6 of Apple’s Greatest MistakesThe Other Steve Jobs: Censorship, Control and Labor RightsWordPress Offers Free Retro Mac Blog Theme In Honor of SteveOn a brighter note, this week we learned that Facebook is as Big as the Internet of 2004. The cool infographic on that post had us all reminiscing on our own early internet experiences and ReadWriteWeb took some time this week to look back on the internet of 1995. Were you on the internet in 1995?Overshadowed this week was the launch of the iPhone 4S. This latest iteration from Apple includes iCloud, an 8 megapixel camera, will work on CDMA and GSM networks and more. Below is a comprehensive wrap-up of our coverage.iPhone 4S LaunchWho’s Gonna Buy the iPhone 4S? Not Us!iCloud: Can Apple Finally Get Seamless Sync Right?iPhone 4S: Siri Should Be Sulu8 Things the iPhone Rumor Mill Got Dead Wrong This TimeWhy Is Apple Joining the Snail Mail Cards Business?Apple Unveils iPhone 4S: Faster CPU, Better Camera and Voice ControlsApple’s “Find My Friends” is Apple at Its WorstApple: iOS 5 Will Be Available For Download on October 12Where Does the iPhone Stand In The World?Why There Was Never Going to Be Facebook Integration In iOS 5Big Question (Answered): “You’ve Seen the iPhone 4S… What Do You Think?”More ‘Don’t Miss’ PostsIs Dropbox Really The World’s 5th Most Valuable Startup?Going It Alone As An Indie App DeveloperHow False Rumors of a Surprise Radiohead Concert Spread OnlineDice.com: Signs of a .NET Talent ShortagePorn Is No Longer A Leading Indicator of Web InnovationOne Billion Tiny, Hyper-Detailed Glowing Earth Models Now in the WildGoogle Maps Adds New Crowdsourced Maps of Afghanistan, Iraq & ElsewhereReadWriteWeb Meetup in PortlandImagine an evening surrounding by cool folks, like yourself, discussing important technology stories, debating the merits of data portability and net neutrality, thumb wrestling over browser preferences and your favorite phone OS. If that sounds like your idea of the coolest evening ever, and you’re local to Portland, OR, please come and hang out with many of the ReadWriteWeb staff, and a group of the most awesome readers a blog could have, at the Green Dragon on October 13, 6:30 – 8:30. RSVP for the Portland MeetupTo plan a ReadWriteWeb meetup in your area, check out our ReadWriteWeb Meetup Everywhere page. There are already half a dozen meetups being planned in November for St Louis, Savannah, Boston, New Zealand and Palo Alto. If your city isn’t there, please list it asap.ReadWriteWeb ChannelsEnterpriseCalifornia Gets Reader Privacy Act: Still Not Enough6 of Apple’s Greatest MistakesThe Way We Were c.1995CloudAmazon Adds SQS Queue Administration to AWS ConsoleWho Wrote Hadoop? It’s the Community, StupidLessons Learned From Target.com’s MessHackIf HTML5 Kills the Blog Format, I Won’t Shed a TearWhat Microsoft Can Learn After Choking Off Desktop GadgetsDice.com: Signs of a .NET Talent ShortageMobileGoing It Alone As An Indie App DeveloperMaine Was the Top State for Tablet Lovers in SeptemberGingerbread Almost on 40% of Android Devices, Froyo Finally Under 50%ReadWriteWeb CommunityYou can find ReadWriteWeb in many places on the web, a few of which are below.ReadWriteWeb on FacebookReadWriteWeb on TwitterReadWriteWeb on LinkedInSubscribe to the ReadWriteWeb Weekly Wrap-upWant to have this wrap up delivered to you automagically? You can subscribe to the Weekly Wrap-up by RSS or by email. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Details