Monday Scramble: Xander rules and rules take center stage

first_imgXander Schauffele demands our attention, Rory McIlroy blows another Sunday, Bryson DeChambeau challenges the Rules of Golf, Cody Blick finds his long-lost clubs and more in this week’s 2019-opening edition of Monday Scramble: Don’t mistake Xander Schauffele’s quiet demeanor for him being overlooked or underrated. No longer should we sell short this talent. With a blistering, 11-under 62 in the final round at Kapalua, Schauffele overtook a game Gary Woodland to win for the second time this season, and for the fourth time in his ascendant career. The 25-year-old – a once-forgotten part of the heralded high school class of 2011 – is now all the way up to No. 6 in the world rankings, ahead of some boldfaced names like Jon Rahm and Rory McIlroy and Rickie Fowler. Three of Schauffele’s four wins have come against limited fields – Tour Championship, WGC-HSBC Champions, Tournament of Champions – but all of those feature elite competition. Just like the rest of the world’s best, he’s now a legitimate threat every time he tees it up.    Your browser does not support iframes. 1. And to think: Schauffele’s course-record-tying round began with a bogey. But beginning on the third hole, he played almost perfect golf to the house, including a couple of hole-outs for eagle (on Nos. 9 and 12) to chase down Woodland. Once again Schauffele showed a flair for the dramatic. On No. 17, the toughest hole on the course, he pured an iron to 9 feet for the first birdie all day. (Woodland would soon match.) And on the home hole, Schauffele striped a 273-yard fairway wood to 12 feet, the go-ahead birdie proving to be the difference, as he finished at 23-under 269. 2. What makes Schauffele tick? Because he has as many Tour wins (four) in 61 Tour starts as Rickie Fowler has managed in 218 events. Schauffele doesn’t wow with statistics: He’s not a bomber, ranking only 34th on Tour in clubhead speed last year. He’s not particularly sharp around the greens, either, ranking 113th in that strokes-gained category. He was only 66th in the all-around statistic. But all he does is win. That suggests that he’s comfortable with his swing and impervious to final-round pressure. Thus: All four of his wins have come when trailing after 54 holes.   3. Talk about some early-season heartbreak for Woodland. Staked to a three-shot lead, he hit some unbelievably clutch shots, shot a bogey-free 68 and still lost by one. He’s now 0-for-7 converting a 54-hole stroke-play lead on Tour. Though he waved at his final 10-footer to force a playoff, it’s hard to overstate just how much better Woodland looks on the greens – a huge credit to the work he’s done with putting guru Phil Kenyon. Now 34, Woodland might finally have matched up a solid putting stroke with his exceptional ball-striking. Your browser does not support iframes. 4. Rory McIlroy had another disappointing Sunday at Kapalua. It’s the sixth time since the beginning of 2016 that the former world No. 1 was first or second heading into the final round of a Tour event. He’s now 0-for-6. He failed to capitalize on any of his mammoth drives for much of the final round, and then he showed himself out with a wayward drive into the bushes on 14, leading to a demoralizing bogey. McIlroy was first in strokes gained: off the tee but never made a putt longer than 12 feet all week. Unfortunately, that’s a familiar refrain. Your browser does not support iframes. 5. It’s easy to see how this went down: In deciding to make a new rule that allowed a player to putt with the flagstick in the hole, the USGA wanted to speed up play for recreational golfers with the belief that there’s no advantage (and it might actually be a disadvantage) to leave in the pin on the greens. Well, Bryson DeChambeau, as he’s wont to do, challenged that notion. And on a situational basis, he’ll leave in the flag not because of any pace-of-play considerations, but because he believes he has a better chance to make the putt. He cited the coefficient of restitution (COR) of a golf ball colliding with a fiberglass flagstick, something the governing bodies admitted that they’d never studied.   Other than players leaving in the stick for tap-ins or long-range putts, the move hasn’t yet caught on (and Justin Thomas went so far as to say that he couldn’t take himself seriously if he kept it in on a tournament-winning putt). But Golf Channel analyst Brandel Chamblee boldly predicted that everyone will be doing it by the end of the year.  Here’s what could happen by the end of 2019: The tours will adopt a local rule to ban leaving the flagstick in; there will be uniformity with the flagstick material to ensure that there’s no advantage; or we’ll have to get used to seeing players putting the flagstick in on 18 at Augusta. It wouldn’t be the first time that the USGA didn’t fully think through a new rule, of course. (Here’s looking at you, anchor ban.) 6. The honeymoon period is (literally) over: Jordan Spieth is ready for 2019. The newly married Spieth was a somewhat surprising commitment to the field list for this week’s Sony Open. He’s played at Waialae each of the past two years (pair of top-18s) because of its positioning on the back-end of the Hawaiian swing. But after two pedestrian appearances in the fall Spieth clearly wanted to get back to work and didn’t want to wait until his usual appearance at Phoenix at the end of the month. There’ll be plenty of attention on how Spieth plays not just at the Sony but for the early portion of ’19. He’s coming off his worst season as a pro.   Your browser does not support iframes. The mysterious case of Cody Blick’s stolen clubs has been solved – well, kind of. You remember Blick – the 25-year-old who, on the eve of the final round of Web.com Tour Q-School, had his clubs swiped from the garage of his rental house. With only a few hours before his tee time, he cobbled together a mismatched set … and then went out and shot a flawless 63 to earn his card for this year. About a month later, those stolen clubs finally surfaced, but only after another bizarre story. Blick’s mom, Carla, received a call from a woman in Arizona who claimed that she’d bought them off a homeless man. Rather than return them for $75, or for free, this “Good Samaritan” instead turned a profit, asking for $300 from the Blick family.   Deal.   Cody Blick likely won’t ever use the clubs again – save for maybe his trusty Scotty Cameron putter, which was still in good shape – but at least the sticks, once they’re disinfected, will forever have a place in his home. This week’s award winners …  Your browser does not support iframes. Under Investigation: Lucy Li. The USGA is looking into the teen phenom’s activities after she appeared in an ad for the Apple Watch. That could be a violation of her amateur status – not that she wasn’t poised to turn pro sometime soon anyway – even though her mother reportedly denied receiving any financial compensation. Stay tuned.  Bad Omen: Rory. He’s now failed to win each of the last seven times he’s been in the final group, he never made a putt longer than 4 feet on Sunday, and his closing 72 was the worst score of anyone in the top 21. Ugh. Shocker (Or Not): Dustin Johnson. Leave it to DJ (who admitted on the eve of the 2019 opener that he hadn’t spent much time reviewing the new rules) to become the first offender of the new year. Of course, he didn’t break a new rule – he played a wrong ball from a penalty area, a two-shot penalty that would have been enforced Dec. 31 and Jan. 1. “That won’t ever happen again,” he said. “I can promise you that.” See, Golfers Are Athletes!: New drop rule. This looks ridiculous, but it’s probably better than the one-inch drop that was originally proposed. Why not a compromise, that players must drop the ball somewhere between shoulder and knee height? Your browser does not support iframes. Uhhh, Awkward: Ariya Jutanugarn’s new caddie. Never mind the strangeness of the world No. 1 dumping her caddie after a successful 2018 in which she swept nearly every season-long award. The fact that she’s now working with a fellow competitor’s fiancé – in this case, ANA Inspiration champion Pernilla Lindberg’s soon-to-be husband, Daniel Taylor – seems too weird to work out. What if Jutanugarn and Lindberg are both in the final group, vying for a major? Legend: Miguel Angel Jimenez. His 55th birthday party looks more fun than any I’ve ever had. Can Only Get Better From Here: Bubba Watson. He finished third-to-last at Kapalua, mostly because of a MIA putter that cost him an incredible 11 1/2 strokes to the field. Blown Fantasy Pick of the Week: Patrick Reed. The 2015 winner at Kapalua also had a solo second (’16) and T-6 (’18). He couldn’t add to that, never posting a round in the 60s to tie for 25th. Sigh.last_img read more

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Solar margins improving, but a long way to go

first_imgSolar margins improving, but a long way to gopv magazine’s Michael Fuhs spoke to Jenny Chase, of Bloomberg New Energy Finance, to get the story behind the latest solar figures and find out why she thinks solar is a commodity, not a high-tech industry. October 8, 2013 pv magazine Finance Markets Markets & Policy Share Michael Fuhs: Who is earning money in the solar industry at the moment?Jenny Chase: Lawyers, some product developers and a few inverter makers but nobody else, really. But if I look at your chart, there are also some module manufacturers.Actually no. There are a few module manufacturers that made money in the last quarter, or at least had positive EBIT margins, but few of these made a net profit in the quarter.REC had a positive EBIT margin though, didn’t it?Yes, REC Solar did. That is actually quite interesting!Does REC prove the point that it doesn’t matter whether you are in China or Europe?REC Solar has a big integrated factory in Singapore – a vertically integrated wafer, cell and module plant that is one of the most automated plants in the world. I think REC has benefited a lot from the uncertainty about anti-dumping tariffs on Chinese modules, because it is seen as a relatively competitive, non-Chinese option.Do you think other European companies could benefit from the anti-dumping tariff discussion and the minimum price regulation, and could achieve positive EBIT margins?I would suspect it’s more likely that other Southeast Asian manufacturers – so Taiwanese, Malaysian, Singaporean and Korean companies – will come in and take market share from the Chinese.Why is it so difficult to have competitive production in Europe?I’m not sure it’s impossible. I don’t think labor costs are such a big part of making a module, especially with the new generation of equipment, which is highly automated. But it’s also very difficult to do anything in Europe on a scale that it’s being done in Southeast Asia. Most of these new plants benefit from massive tax breaks. Malaysia offers pretty significant tax holidays. And if you’re going to build a 1 or 2 GW fab, then you’re going to do it where you have that sort of advantage.Do those tax breaks conform to WTO regulations?I think you’re allowed to give tax breaks to manufacturing, because nearly every government does it to some extent.So there’s no excuse for European governments not to follow suit?I think they would be joining the club. I mean there have certainly been European Union grants to solar manufacturers in Europe. I’m not a lawyer; I don’t know exactly when it starts becoming a problem for the WTO, but certainly countries implementing strategic support for their high-tech manufacturing industries, is very much the way of the world.Regarding high-tech manufacturing industries, in your talk you showed that…… solar isn’t actually that high-tech?Exactly. Why, in your opinion, is solar more of a commodity than high-tech industry?There are parts of solar which are high tech. Making silicon is a very high-technology process, in fact it consists of two high-technology processes end to end. Designing inverters is probably quite high-tech too, but making solar wafers, cells and modules is a commodity manufacturing business. You’ve got to have the equipment, and you’ve got to be good at turning out lots of goods that are all the same without wasting a lot of energy on materials. And you can buy the equipment off the shelf. I mean, if you and I decided to go into business making modules in the European Union and we could get ourselves, say €20 million to start with, we could probably do it within six months.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. 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Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Asia Pacific’s solarized digitization agenda Selva Ozelli, Esq. 23 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The virtual 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum was hosted in March by Japan’s Ministry of the Environment,… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. 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Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… iAbout these recommendations Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Reducing solar project risk for extreme weather 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsDaniel H.S. Chang, VP of Business Development | RETCGreg Beardsworth, Sr. Director of Product M… Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Out with the old… A guide to successful inverter replacement , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRoberto Arana-Gonzalez, Service Sales Manager EMEA, SungrowFranco Marino, Regional Service Mana… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print Pretty stressful Cornelia Lichner 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com To find out whether a module is susceptible to potential-induced degradation, you can conduct stress tests in a climate chamber. 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Casting Set for Rachel Chavkin’s New Staging of Arthur Miller’s The American Clock at The Old Vic

first_imgRachel Chavkin(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser for Broadway.com) View Comments Full casting has been announced for the upcoming production of Arthur Miller’s 1980 play The American Clock at London’s Old Vic. Directed by Tony nominee Rachel Chavkin (The Great Comet), the play will begin previews on February 4, 2019 with an opening slated for February 13.The company will include Amber Aga (Ant Street), Paul Bentall (Eastward Ho!), Greg Bernstein (42nd Street), Clare Burt (Flowers for Mrs. Harris), Flora Dawson (Singin’ in the Rain), Abhin Galeya (Big Aftermath of a Small Disclosure), Fred Haig (Follies), Jyuddah Jaymes (The Garden Hop), John Marquez (Once in a Lifetime), Francesca Mills (Pity), Taheen Modak (The Bay), Christian Patterson (The Way of the World), Golda Rosheuvel (The Big I Am), Abdul Salis (Barber Shop Chronicles), Josie Walker (Everybody’s Talking About Jamie) and Ewan Wardrop (The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips). Further casting will be announced.Set in 1929 New York City, The American Clock centers on the Baum family as they navigate the aftermath of an unprecedented financial crisis. Chavkin’s production will feature a soundtrack fusing 1920s swing and jazz with movement.The American Clock will feature scenic design by Chloe Lamford, costume design by Rosie Elnile, lighting design by Natasha Chivers and sound design by Darron L. West. The creative team will also include musical director Jim Henson, composer Justin Ellington and choreographer Ann Yee.Chavkin is making quite the splash on the London theater scene, with her Broadway-bound staging of Hadestown currently in performances in the West End.Hear more about The Old Vic’s new production of The American Clock from Chavkin below.last_img read more

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