Dani Alves does not want to ask for Brazil’s forgiveness

first_img Sport EN “I don’t like unfairness and I care little for what others think of me, I am not politically correct nor live to please anyone. I look for positive energy from the right people, from those who live for a purpose.” “Apologies are only for losers, and we are absolutely not that! We work for love, for pleasure and for passion, in order to see our dedication turn into results.” “Everyone says that our job is easy… in reality we are workhorses, in order to continue moving forward we need winners, not historians.. many know who we are, but few actually know us.” 03/07/2015 Upd. on 22/11/2016 at 03:06 CET “A champion falls but gets back up, to continue looking for his dreams. Winning? I have won everything that you can win, but my dream is to continue.” Brazil’s elimination from the Copa America has been the source of some discomfort in the country, but their players have not taken well to press and public criticism. Dani Alves has shown his disagreement publicly, for what he considers to be an unfair attack. Using social media, the defender has published a long reflection on Instagram to explain his thoughts.last_img read more

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Dudis unfazed by coup

first_imgBy LIA SPENCER WHEN Stephanie and Jeff Dudi left for Thailand, their biggest worry was about how well their seven-month-old…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Orville Higgins | Waiting for that WCup buzz

first_img Luddy would tell us how he had heard that Zico could kick the ball from one spot on the centre circle and it travelled all the way round and came back to him! He would tell us how Socrates could control the ball on his chest so well that sometimes it stuck there! The more bizarre the stories, the more we used to gather around him, spellbound by his almost daily repertoire of Brazilian stories. The day when Italy beat Brazil 3-2, I was worried that Luddy would commit suicide. Maradona ended the tournament in disgrace, but I had seen enough of his mercurial talent to know he would create waves. I couldn’t wait for the ’86 tournament, where Diego dazzled. He became my first non-cricket hero. Luddy now started to hate Diego only because he had surpassed the Brazilians, and he couldn’t convince anyone anymore about those wacky Brazilian tales. To this day, he won’t admit it, though. By 1990, I was a student at Church Teachers’ College. I remember hurrying out of exams to watch games. Sometimes I would take two hours to do a three-hour paper just so I could catch the kick-off. My classmates thought I was crazy. I probably was, or I was unknowingly preparing for my later profession. I argued long and hard with my college friends about that Argentina vs Brazil game where Claudio Cannigia scored after getting that pass (right-footed, by the way) from Maradona. Brazil, they said, played much better. I did not agree. I took on the whole college. My argument was simple: you cannot play better than a team and lose. We still have that argument almost 30 years later! The World Cup was more fascinating for us then because we didn’t see the footballers on TV as readily as we do now. The amount of club football being shown now has taken away from the World Cup experience for me. There is no more mystery about what a player can do. It was the World Cup we used to settle arguments about who the best players were. Nowadays, we hear that Champions League performances must carry greater weight than World Cup performances. We have become almost too familiar with the players. I will watch of course. Do not get me wrong. But now, I will watch the way you watch your favourite actor in his new movie. You do it out of the need to be entertained, not with the kind of breathless anticipation that I used to feel back in the day. Maybe I have simply grown up! – Orville Higgins is a sportscaster and talk-show host. LUDDY’S STORIES Maybe the promotional campaigns have not been good enough in both the local and overseas media. Maybe I was too caught up with the NBA playoffs and my mind has not yet made the mental switch over to football. Maybe I have watched (and been part of) too many World Cup discussions, and now I simply want the action to get underway. Maybe I am simply getting old. For some reason, the World Cup bug hasn’t quite bitten yet. I am waiting for that adrenaline rush to take over when I think about the tournament in Russia. It is not happening, and I am not sure why. Maybe I should not be questioning this. Maybe as time passes we all get less excited about certain events. Do we feel the same buzz about Christmas or birthdays at 40 as we did at 20? Should we? Maybe not. Maybe as we get older some of us adopt an “I have seen it all before” position on most things and, therefore, find it hard to feel the same level of excitement. Maybe it is unreasonable to expect that I will feel the same way about World Cups now as I did way back in the 1980s. In the build-up to the 1982 tournament, I was a mere lad, but for some reason, I remember reading with interest anything that involved Diego Maradona. He fascinated me. Not many people talk about it, but Maradona was then quite a handsome dude with an aura about him. Like the Michael Jackson of the early 1980s, Maradona grabbed my interest not just with his talent, but also his captivating image. Everybody around me was saying Brazil. Everywhere you turned, people were saying that the team with Zico and Socrates and Eder and Falcao were simply too good to lose. Maybe all that talk about Brazil made me want them to lose. In looking back now, I may have been fixated on Maradona only because I saw him as the one who would beat Brazil and shut up my neighbours. There was a fellow in my first-form class at Mannings High who used to tell us all kinds of fanciful stories about that 1982 Brazil team. God alone knows where he got his stories from. Ludlow Spence, you need to tell us where you got that over active imagination.last_img read more

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Viernes keys hot Batangas start

first_img11 nabbed for shabu, drug den busted in Maguindanao Taal evacuees make the most of ‘unusual’ clothing donations, leaves online users laughing Feeding off the energy of the home crowd, Viernes found Adi Santos for a layup on the next play as Batangas finished the game with a flourish to hand coach Goldwyn Monteverde a winning start to his MPBL career. The Athletics’ impressive debut nearly overshadowed Nueva Ecija’s stunning 78-76 triumph over Marikina. JR Cawaling scored on a putback off a Marlon Monte miss with a second remaining.ADVERTISEMENT Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Steaming fissures on Taal Volcano Island spotted LATEST STORIES PBA IMAGES FILE PHOTOBatangas City’s spitfire guard Jeff Viernes is not making excuses for his team’s failure to defend their Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League title last season. And Viernes has taken it upon himself to lead the Athletics, the MPBL’s inaugural season champions, in their road to redemption in the Lakan Season. ADVERTISEMENT Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Rio’s unsafe Olympic Park ordered closed by Brazilian judge Solon urges Solgen to reconsider quo warranto petition vs ABS-CBN Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ The reigning All-Star Game Most Valuable Player fired 25 points, including 18 in the second half, as the Athletics held off the Muntinlupa Cagers, 79-70, in their season opener at Batangas City Coliseum. “We’ve remained positive,” said Viernes, acknowledging the fact that they lost to a better team in the Davao Occidental Tigers in last season’s South division finals. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubs“Now we’ve formed a team with one goal which is to regain the title. We don’t have any excuses for our failure last season. We lost players, but we also added players. In the end, we just fell short.”Viernes’ take-charge mentality was on full display in the final period as he buried a three-pointer to break the game’s final deadlock for a 69-66 advantage with 3:13 remaining. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:43Passenger volume spike at Araneta bus terminals00:50Trending Articles00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award03:05Malakanyang bilib sa Phivolcs | Chona Yu01:26Homes destroyed after Taal Volcano eruption Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Jones, KaTropa looking unstoppable Deandre Ayton shines as Suns pound Knicks Olympic rings arrive in host city on barge into Tokyo Bay View commentslast_img read more

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Court Tight-lipped on US$10.7m Ruling

first_imgL-R: Judge Eva Mappy Morgan and George Haddad, who is seeking a US$10.7M judgement against government.Commercial Court Chief Judge Eva Mappy Morgan has remained tight-lipped regarding rescheduling her ruling to compel the court to decide whether or not it has the legal jurisdiction to hear the US$10.7 million vehicle case against the government.The case was filed against the government by Prestige and Alliance Motor Corporation, owned by Lebanese businessman George Haddad.In what should have been a landmark ruling last Tuesday but which was suspended, information said it was due to the sudden absence of Judge Morgan that caused the suspension of the ruling.Judge Morgan is yet to communicate with the parties (government and Haddad’s lawyers) as to when she would decide the matter. The case has been going on since 2015.“There has not been any information why she was not in court to deliver the long awaited ruling,” said a legal source.The two other judges last week refused to speak or read the court’s ruling in the absence of Chief Judge Morgan, despite persistent plea from Haddad’s legal team to do so. Prior to the court action, Haddad and his employees were already celebrating the anticipated ruling, which they believed would have allowed them to collect their debt from the government. Meanwhile a legal source indicated to the Daily Observer that the Liberian government would prefer an out-of-court settlement, rather than continuing with the legal issue.Haddad’s legal team in 2012 filed an “Action of Debt” against the government, claiming over US$10 million for fleet of vehicles supplied to several public entities, from 2003 to 2006, which he alleged the government has refused to pay.Haddad is said to have provided spare parts for the vehicles as well as rendering services, which accumulated to US$10.7 million.The Liberian government admitted crediting the vehicles from Haddad and owed him the amount in question but has insisted that the court has no jurisdiction to hear the matter on grounds that it was established in 2010, which does not gives it any legal right to hear a matter predating its establishment.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Lessons for Guyanese leaders from the life of Matamela Ramaphosa

first_imgDear Editor,A few days ago, I was greeted by the welcome news that Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa is the new head of South Africa’s ruling party, the African National Congress (ANC).This ardent Christian was, as a boy, a follower of Steve Biko’s doctrine; while as a youth leader, notable lawyer, trade union top brass, successful businessman (multi-millionaire), architect of constructive social compacts, former general secretary of the ANC, and accomplished public/private partnership achiever, he would likely become the next president of South Africa.However, there are three other aspects of Ramaphosa’s persona which I would like to highlight and recommend for serious consideration by some current and aspiring politicians.They are: 1) His track record as a negotiator/trust builder; 2) his loyalty to party leadership, even in the face of decisions that smack of unfairness to his political career; and 3) his willingness to publicly express remorse for a lack of judgement.Now to the first: In 1992, after talks broke down between the De Klerk government (there is a tendency to underplay De Klerk’s significant role in the reconciliation process), the ANC and other parties, Nelson Mandela reasserted his leadership with a priority to haul South Africa ‘out of the quagmire’. Behind the scenes, ever since talks had broken off, two key negotiators — Cyril Ramaphosa, aged forty, from the ANC, and Roelf Meyer, forty-five, from the Government side — stayed in touch in private with an aim to pick up the pieces. They were convinced that the way out of the impasse was for the Government and the ANC to reach bilateral understanding before multi-party talks continued. They struck up an effective working relationship, meeting privately in hotel rooms, and managed to establish a measure of trust which survived despite the turmoil, and provided the basis for the process to resume.Our country has had unsuccessful efforts by private sector organisations, such as the GMA under Ramesh Dookhoo’s leadership, to engage the main political parties in a trust-building initiative (more in a subsequent letter), Caricom, and persons like the late Hugh Cholmondeley’s shuttle diplomacy to avoid Guyana becoming a ‘Caribbean Rwanda’. The “three wise men”, despite the limited outcomes, are about the highest achievers in Guyana’s political conflict resolution efforts to date.The second noteworthy point of Ramaposa’s career I wish to illustrate to those seeking the political kingdom and are impatient to access a powerbase ‘gravy train’ above service to ‘king and country’ follows: In 1994, Ramaphosa, then general secretary of the ANC and a key figure in drawing up a new constitution, lost a bid to become Mandela’s deputy. That was a hard blow, but being a disciplined politician and loyal follower, and being persuaded by Mandela, he went into business. For the next twenty years, this astute gentleman, who was deeply influenced by Christianity and later communism, developed deep links with the private sector. He directed his energies into building a massive holding company, ‘Shanduka,’ with a range of investments in sectors such as mining, telecommunications, the media, beverages, and fast foods. He remained close to the ANC as a member of the national disciplinary committee and manoeuvered a major comeback on the political scene in 2012, becoming deputy president of the ANC and eventually the country.In Guyana, I recall a former President lamenting the indiscipline and display of impatience by a few ‘young turks’ he had brought into politics at a senior party level. Within a short time, they felt he was obsolete and should be replaced by a more relevant party leader from amongst them. They proceeded to wage a not-so-subtle campaign for the leader’s removal.The third characteristic of Ramaphosa that is worthy of emulation by many persons occupying high political office is his public apology for a lapse of judgement. As a wealthy person, he had spent lavishly on fast cars, top bred cattle, and luxurious living, among other vices. His reputation was slightly tainted by allegations of inciting police use of force that killed thirty-four (34) workers at the Markana platinum mine in August 2012. Though cleared by a Commission of Inquiry, he also apologized on national radio for the insensitive language he used leading to the actual killings; humbly expressing regrets for being excessive in a sea of poverty, not paying workers a decent wage, and admitted he had been blind-sighted.My only recollection of top Guyanese political leaders issuing a public apology are: 1) Dr. Ptolemy Reid, former Prime Minister, tendering regret for the Government’s closure of the Transport & Harbours Department Railway Service and; 2) Dr. Cheddi Jagan, for saying ‘black people are at the lowest rung of the ladder’.Today the South Africa Rand is racing to a nine-month high. Traders are warming to a Ramaphosa presidency, and there is renewed confidence in a South African economy with solid democratic and governance structures.There is much to emulate from the life of Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa by many Guyanese leaders as our nation gears to embrace its economic fortunes championed by a booming oil and gas sector.Happy New Year.Yours faithfully,Derrick Cummingslast_img read more

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Youth Development Initiative rolled out at Lusignan Primary School

first_imgFirst Lady Sandra Granger said that she was optimistic about the impact the Lusignan Youth Development Initiative will have on its beneficiaries, at a simple opening ceremony held at the Lusignan Primary School on Monday.Mrs Granger said that the Initiative was birthed from an idea she had about involving parents in the delivery of education to their children. The first project under this initiative was introduced last year in Buxton at the Buxton/Friendship Primary School.“I have to say, based on the results in Buxton, I have high hopes for Lusignan as well, because we had kids who had started Grade Four in the Buxton/Friendship area who did not know [how] to read and by the end of the year… there was great improvement,” related the First Lady.First Lady Sandra Granger (seated second left) along with the teachers and students at the opening of the Youth Development Initiative at the Lusignan Primary SchoolOver the past couple of weeks, Mrs Granger met with teachers and parents of students of Lusignan Primary about the Initiative and although there were minor setbacks, she believes that they had shown a keen interest in the programme and, therefore, took a decision to go ahead with it.“We felt that since the teachers were so engaged in it [the meetings], we would go ahead with it… What this project aims to do, basically, is to look at the students in the school and help them to achieve their full potential,” the First Lady said.Acting Headmistress of the Lusignan Primary School, Loretta DosSantos said that the Initiative aimed to make the school and community better. “You parents play an integral role in this, the education process… Do not feel what we’re doing here is a waste of time. In time to come, you will see the benefits,” DosSantos said.In an invited comment, she expressed confidence about the impact that the Initiative will have on the students’ development.“I believe that the children who are benefiting from this programme would be better off academically in the areas of mainly literacy and numeracy… I told the teachers we have to work assiduously to ensure that each child is being given what this programme intends for them to have.”The Initiative is expected to last throughout this school year. Initially, 50 students were targeted for the programme, but that number was increased to 80 following feedback from the school. Sessions are expected to be held from Monday to Wednesday, and will focus on Reading and Mathematics.last_img read more

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Di Maria, Cavani strike to sink Malmo

first_img0Shares0000PSG’s Angel Di Maria, left, and PSG’s Edinson Cavani react after di Maria scored the opening goal during the Champions League Group A soccer match between PSG and Malmo at the Parc des Princes stadium in Paris, France, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015. PHOTO/AP/Yahoo!PARIS, September 16 – Angel Di Maria and Edinson Cavani were on target as Paris Saint-Germain began their Champions League campaign with an ultimately comfortable 2-0 win against Malmo at the Parc des Princes on Tuesday.Di Maria scored less than four minutes into his Champions League debut as a PSG player to set the French champions on their way, but they missed a succession of opportunities before finally extending their advantage when Cavani headed home in the 61st minute. With Real Madrid and Shakhtar Donetsk also in Group A, Paris needed a strong start against the Swedish champions as they target not just qualification for the knockout rounds but an improvement on their runs to the quarter-finals in each of the last three campaigns.But while they got the points, it was not a vintage display by Laurent Blanc’s side with Zlatan Ibrahimovic wasteful in front of goal and later being substituted against his hometown team and the club with whom he started his illustrious career back in 1999.“It’s not easy to win at home or away in the Champions League, so to win 2-0, cause our opponents problems and look comfortable at the back is a good start even if there are certain things we will need to perfect as the season goes on,” said Blanc.“It augurs well. We wanted to win and we did, although I regret that we did not score one or two goals more.”Ibrahimovic returned after injury in one of three changes to the Paris team that had been held to a 2-2 draw at home by Bordeaux in Ligue 1 at the weekend, but he was upstaged in the fourth minute by Di Maria.The Argentina winger was labelled as the man to take PSG to the next level in Europe when he was signed from Manchester United last month, and he indicated why as he ran onto Marco Verratti’s pass in behind the Malmo defence before angling a beautiful finish past Johan Wiland and into the far corner of the net.However, if anyone then expected PSG to romp to a big victory, they were to be disappointed.Malmo, who beat Celtic in a play-off to reach this stage, lined up with nine full internationals on the field at kick-off and, with a five-man defence and two deep in midfield, were stuffy opponents.But, save for a Nikola Djurdjic shot that slid just wide of Kevin Trapp’s far post in the 34th minute, they offered little in attack.– Ibrahimovic misfires – Instead, PSG let themselves down at times with some wasteful passing and poor finishing, not least from Ibrahimovic, who failed to convert no fewer than five attempts in the first half alone and was then let down by his touch having been put in by Cavani just after the restart.Nevertheless, he proved much more adept when it came to setting up his colleagues, and it was from an Ibrahimovic pass that Di Maria sent in a curling shot which was tipped around the post by Wiland on 52 minutes.The second goal finally arrived just after the hour mark thanks to Cavani, the Uruguayan heading home his sixth of the season after Ibrahimovic had flicked on a left-wing cross from Maxwell.That ended any ideas that Malmo had of coming back into the game, and only a superb stop by Wiland from point-blank range to deny David Luiz kept the final score down before substitute Ezequiel Lavezzi had a goal disallowed right at the death.Malmo coach Age Hareide later admitted PSG were a class above his side, the Norwegian saying: “Our last Champions League game was in December last year.“Since then we have only played in the Swedish league which is not the same level. The qualifiers are not enough.“Hats off to Paris. It was a magnificent match from them.”0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

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Study finds lack of sleep a heavy burden for kids

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre The study gives parents one more reason to enforce bedtimes, restrict caffeine and yank the TV from the bedroom. The study appears in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics. Lack of sleep plays havoc with two hormones that are the “yin and yang of appetite regulation,” said endocrinologist Eve Van Cauter of the University of Chicago, who was not involved in the new study. In experiments by Van Cauter and others, sleep-deprived adults produced more ghrelin, a hormone that promotes hunger, and less leptin, a hormone that signals fullness. Another explanation: Tired kids are less likely to exercise and more likely to sit on the couch and eat cookies, Lumeng said. Dr. Stephen Sheldon, director of sleep medicine at Chicago’s Children’s Memorial Hospital, praised the study and called for more research. He said children’s sleep may be disturbed by breathing problems – some caused by overweight, such as sleep apnea, and some caused by enlarged tonsils and adenoids. CHICAGO – Here’s another reason to get the kids to bed early: More sleep may lower their risk of becoming obese. Researchers have found that every additional hour per night a third-grader spends sleeping reduces the child’s chances of being obese in sixth grade by 40 percent. The less sleep they got, the more likely the children were to be obese in sixth grade, no matter what the child’s weight was in third grade, said Dr. Julie Lumeng of the University of Michigan, who led the research. If there was a magic number for the third-graders, it was nine hours, 45 minutes of sleep. Sleeping more than that lowered the risk significantly. “I’m not so sure we have enough information yet on cause and effect,” said Sheldon, who was not involved in the study. Researchers used data from an existing federal study and focused on 785 children with complete information on sleep, and height and weight in the third grade and sixth grade. The children lived in 10 U.S. cities.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgSATURDAY Leona Valley Sertoma Club meets, 8 a.m. the first and third Saturdays of each month at Jackie’s Restaurant, 40352 90th St. W., Leona Valley. Call (661) 270-0339.Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700.Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBasketball roundup: Sierra Canyon, Birmingham set to face off in tournament quarterfinalsAl-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353.Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org.Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341.Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839.Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798.Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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