Getting It Right: A New Global Model to Tackle Poverty and Climate Change

first_imgThis commentary on originally appeared online at DevexThe international community has a rare opportunity in 2015 to confront two linked global challenges: extreme poverty and climate change.In September, the United Nations is expected to agree on a new agenda aimed at eradicating poverty and advancing sustainable development. In December, climate negotiators will gather in Paris, France, to reach an agreement to accelerate the shift to a low-carbon economy and strengthen resilience to climate change.Success this year will depend on whether or not we can develop a new model for international cooperation that is universal — including all countries — yet differentiated — recognizing differences between countries.Twenty years ago, the development and climate communities divided countries into two groups — rich and poor — and specified who needed to do what. Today, such a binary distinction is much less relevant given the rapidly changing economic and political context.The Solutions We NeedWhat we need are solutions that involve all countries but that respect the differing levels of responsibility and the capacity of individual countries to respond to these twin challenges.The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, established in 1992, led to the Kyoto Protocol and binding targets among developed countries to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The protocol reflected the thinking of its time: It divided the world into developed countries that needed to cut carbon pollution and developing ones that did not. Economic development and emissions profiles have changed dramatically since then and an agreement that only expects cuts from developed countries will ultimately fail to prevent catastrophic warming.The story is similar for efforts to reduce poverty. The Millennium Development Goals, launched in 2001, imagined a world where developing countries could improve the lives of their poorest citizens, with developed countries providing aid and other support. While income poverty — the number of people living on $1.25 a day or less — has been significantly reduced, with impressive gains made in providing basic education and health services, there is now recognition that eradicating extreme poverty will require more than just aid and good domestic policy. It will also require a broader suite of actions from all countries — and across economic, social and environmental realms.What is the architecture we need for international cooperation in this new world? And how can we ensure that the commitments countries make, in aggregate, are sufficiently ambitious to tackle these two challenges and be sufficiently fair to ensure global engagement?We are starting to see the outlines of a new model for just this kind of international cooperation.From Top-Down to Bottom-UpThe next international climate agreement will shift from a top-down, legally binding system that specifies how much each developed country must reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to a bottom-up approach where all countries — developed and developing — determine their own level of commitment.Whether these voluntary pledges will collectively set us in the right direction to keep the world at or below 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) of warming above pre-industrial levels is a critical question. An equally important question is whether the pledges are perceived as fair, given that the contribution and capacity to tackle this problem varies considerably between countries.Last November’s pact between the world’s largest historic emitter, the United States, and its largest current one, China, sends a crucial message about the importance of working together, while respecting differences.The proposed sustainable development goals reflect a similarly important shift. Unlike the MDGs, these goals and their associated targets will be universal in scope. Poverty is not confined to the developing world. Developed countries are expected to adopt the agenda and take actions to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development within their own borders, as well as ensuring that relevant policies such as those on trade, investment or migration support developing countries in tackling poverty. Finally, all countries will be expected to tackle global challenges, such as climate change, that threaten to exacerbate poverty if left unaddressed.2015 will not answer all questions related to these twin challenges, but it will lay the framework for international cooperation for the next decade. The emerging architecture will require all countries to work together. If designed well, it can set the stage for true transformation that can benefit the hundreds of millions of people still struggling to escape poverty, as well as those facing the mounting threats of climate change. The stakes are high. We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right.last_img read more

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Schofield Expands into Newsletter Publishing

first_imgSchofield Media was founded in 1999 by British entrepreneur Andrew Schofield (then Schofield Publishing). In 2005, the company received funding from private equity firm Veronis Suhler Stevenson and acquired Boston-based RedCoat Publishing—including American Executive and American Health Executive magazines—and three titles from VNU. In 2006, Schofield acquired SB Communications, a London-based publisher of medical journals for the diabetic sector. In February, the company purchased Seattle-based high-tech b-to-b company CTQ Media, and its iSixSigma subsidiary.Schofield Media publishes 16 b-to-b magazines and has offices in London, Boston, Chicago and New York. Schofield Publishing, a division of international b-to-b publisher Schofield Media, has acquired Health and Safety Monitor from England’s Silverdog Publishing.Terms of the deal were not disclosed.The acquisition, Schofield’s third in as many years, expands the publisher’s reach into the health and safety markets and is its first property to include newsletter publishing. “Health and safety is a topic that cuts across all the titles we currently publish, and fits well with our portfolio,” Schofield Publishing’s Mike Tulloch said in a statement. “Also, the Health and Safety Monitor brings us into the newsletter publishing market, a new area for us but one that I believe offers a lot of further opportunities.”“I think this is a very sensible acquisition,” Jordan, Edmiston Group managing director Richard Mead told FOLIO:. “Schofield Media has developed a dynamic ad sales focus that has been successful for them. They’ve been looking to expand into this sector, and this seems like a great fit.”last_img read more

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Previous Bidder Takes Minority Stake in TV Guide Network for 123M

first_imgSEE ALSO: TV Guide President OutThe sell-off of TV Guide has taken another strange turn.Film entertainment studio Lionsgate said it has sold a 49 percent stake in the TV Guide Network and TVGuide.com to Allen Shapiro and One Equity Partners for $123 million in cash. The announcement comes less than five months after Santa Clara, California-based digital software solutions firm Macrovision backed out on an agreement to sell the network to Shapiro and the private equity firm for as much as $300 million, deciding instead to sell to Lionsgate for $250 million.According to One Equity Partners managing director Greg O’Hara, “the marriage of Lionsgate’s tremendous content creation and marketing prowess, our financial resources and expertise and Allen Shapiro’s media investment track record form the kind of winning combination that we have sought from day one.””This makes sense in that Lionsgate is laying off part of their bet and is a quick source of money to pay back part of their outlay,” DeSilva + Phillips partner Jeff Dearth told FOLIO:. “It also makes sense in that Lionsgate knew they were interested before. Maybe there are other assets at the private equity group that made sense for Lionsgate to align with, too.”As part of the deal, Shapiro will serve as chairman of the joint venture and, with Lionsgate co-chairman and CEO Jon Feltheimer, will help lead the channel’s executive committee. One Equity Partners also retained the option to purchase an additional 1 percent of the TV Guide Network and TVGuide.com under “certain circumstances.”Last fall, Macrovision sold the print edition of TV Guide to Beverly Hills, California-based investment firm OpenGate Capital for $1, but kept the Web site. As part of the financial terms, Macrovision was to loan OpenGate up to $9.5 million at 3 percent interest.last_img read more

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Neetu Chandra on breakup with Randeep Hooda Life is too long you

first_imgWhile she may have done a number of films, we will always remember Neetu for her unconventional role in Oye Lucky Lucky Oye. Currently busy promoting her new song Ishqa, Neetu would be seen in a sensuous avatar in the song.In an interview with Spotboye, Neetu revealed several unknown aspects of her life and her career. Neetu disclosed that she was the first choice for the role of Tanu in Tanu Weds Manu and the role played by Sonakshi Sinha in Dabangg. Apart from this, the actress also revealed that she has a house in the US and thus would keep shuttling between the US and Mumbai.While work keeps her busy, Neetu has reportedly been single after her break-up with Randeep Hooda five years ago. Crediting Randeep for bringing professionalism in her, Neetu told the website that she chose not to talk about the relationship as it involved another person too and also the fact that she doesn’t feel comfortable talking about her personal life.She added that by talking about her personal life, she feels her work wouldn’t get the attention it deserves. “But, I would always say that even in my relationship in the past, I have learnt a lot. Also, I have to say this on record that a lot of seriousness for my profession as an actor has come from him. It’s been a chapter of my life. I’m thankful and happy also at the same time that I’m out of it and doing other things. But, I have high respect for him and it won’t go which is fine,” said Neetu.Further talking about what made them part ways, Neetu said, “We are friends and we have a great equation. Life is too long, you cannot just have fights and not talk to your ex-boyfriend. It’s okay, it is life, move on. And we had our own priorities. Like, I had my own priorities. My family really mattered to me and my profession too. I even lost my dad to cancer. He had his own priorities of seeing his career and going ahead and doing his things. So sometimes, two good people cannot work together because they are looking for the same things and there might be clashes.”last_img read more

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2332 committed suicide in 7yrs in Jhenaidah

first_imgA total of 2,332 people committed suicide in Jhenaidah district in the last seven years till 2016, according to the Society for Voluntary Activities (SOVA), reports UNB.SOVA, which has been working on suicide in Jhenidah for over 10 years, collected the data from the local police super’s office and Sadar hospital.As per the data, 776 suicide cases were reported in Sadar upazila while 443 in Shailakupa, 292 in Harinakundu, 322 in Kaliganj, 182 in Kotchandpur and 317 in Moheshpur upazila during the period.Of the victims, 1,457 were females and 875 males, the data shows.Around 20 people in every 1 lakh people killed themselves in the district from 2010 to 2016.Besides, as many as 17,697 people made suicide attempts during the period.Mentioning that suicide is preventable, SOVA executive director Zahidul Islam said counselling and motivation to the vulnerable people are the best way to do so.He also said publicity, open discussion, seminar, drama, folksong, press conference, rally, human chain, column writing in local, regional and national newspapers and highlighting the negative aspects of suicide on websites will also be effective measures to prevent the menace.Zahidul stressed the importance of taking different preventive measures by the government.last_img read more

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Suspicious Package Sent to Cruzs Campaign Office TEAs Private Meetings about HISD

first_imgTuesday, October 2, 2018Top afternoon stories:Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News via AP, PoolSenator Ted Cruz.Suspicious package sent to Cruz’s campaign officeThe FBI is investigating a suspicious package sent to the local office of Senator Ted Cruz’s campaign.The office is located at 3200 Southwest Freeway and, according to the Houston Fire Department, two people were taken to the hospital after being exposed to a “white powdery substance.”Catherine Frazier, spokeswoman for the Cruz campaign, detailed that the campaign’s staff is all right and that the people who were hospitalized are not members of her team.TEA’s private meetings when HISD future was uncertainThe Texas Education Agency held private meetings to discuss the future of the Houston school district earlier this year, when the future of several Houston schools and the elected school board was at stake.News 88.7 checked out the calendar of Texas’ Deputy Education Commissioner AJ Crabill. It shows that over a period of 10 weeks from April to June, Crabill visited Houston nearly every weekend and had over two dozen meetings with community leaders, education advocates and others. They met at places like House of Pies, Hotel Zaza, private homes and community centers.News 88.7 confirmed with at least two participants that Crabill discussed the state law that triggers a school board takeover, known as House Bill 1842.Last school year, the Houston school district managed to avoid a state board of managers or closing several schools. However, it must continue to improve to continue to avoid those penalties.Darko Stojanovic/PixnioHoustonians plan on spending $682 on holiday shopping this year, according to Accenture.Houston holiday shopping forecastWith Christmas less than three months away, you may start thinking about your holiday shopping.Consulting firm Accenture already has some insights on this year’s trends.The firm’s annual holiday shopping survey shows as usual, Houston is above average when it comes to spending: At $682, Houstonians plan to spend $24 more than the national average this year.Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUTA now-shuttered coal plant near Rockport, Texas. The plant closed in early 2018.EPA proposal could weaken mercury ruleA new Trump Administration proposal could weaken federal limits on mercury pollution from power plants. The move comes even as Texas power utilities have said the rule is working.In July, trade groups representing power companies and utilities across the state and the country asked the EPA to keep an Obama-era rule on mercury emissions “in place and effective.”In a letter to the agency, the groups said nationwide, the federal rule, similar state regulations and other factors have led to an almost 90 percent drop in mercury pollution, and that the industry has spent more than $18 billion installing new mercury controls at plants.The groups did ask the EPA to consider “potential technical revisions” to the rule, including less-frequent performance tests if power plants aren’t running as often.The EPA acknowledges the progress, and says it’s not trying to weaken or roll back the rule with the new proposal. Sharelast_img read more

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