Getting It Right: A New Global Model to Tackle Poverty and Climate Change

first_imgThis commentary on originally appeared online at DevexThe international community has a rare opportunity in 2015 to confront two linked global challenges: extreme poverty and climate change.In September, the United Nations is expected to agree on a new agenda aimed at eradicating poverty and advancing sustainable development. In December, climate negotiators will gather in Paris, France, to reach an agreement to accelerate the shift to a low-carbon economy and strengthen resilience to climate change.Success this year will depend on whether or not we can develop a new model for international cooperation that is universal — including all countries — yet differentiated — recognizing differences between countries.Twenty years ago, the development and climate communities divided countries into two groups — rich and poor — and specified who needed to do what. Today, such a binary distinction is much less relevant given the rapidly changing economic and political context.The Solutions We NeedWhat we need are solutions that involve all countries but that respect the differing levels of responsibility and the capacity of individual countries to respond to these twin challenges.The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, established in 1992, led to the Kyoto Protocol and binding targets among developed countries to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The protocol reflected the thinking of its time: It divided the world into developed countries that needed to cut carbon pollution and developing ones that did not. Economic development and emissions profiles have changed dramatically since then and an agreement that only expects cuts from developed countries will ultimately fail to prevent catastrophic warming.The story is similar for efforts to reduce poverty. The Millennium Development Goals, launched in 2001, imagined a world where developing countries could improve the lives of their poorest citizens, with developed countries providing aid and other support. While income poverty — the number of people living on $1.25 a day or less — has been significantly reduced, with impressive gains made in providing basic education and health services, there is now recognition that eradicating extreme poverty will require more than just aid and good domestic policy. It will also require a broader suite of actions from all countries — and across economic, social and environmental realms.What is the architecture we need for international cooperation in this new world? And how can we ensure that the commitments countries make, in aggregate, are sufficiently ambitious to tackle these two challenges and be sufficiently fair to ensure global engagement?We are starting to see the outlines of a new model for just this kind of international cooperation.From Top-Down to Bottom-UpThe next international climate agreement will shift from a top-down, legally binding system that specifies how much each developed country must reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to a bottom-up approach where all countries — developed and developing — determine their own level of commitment.Whether these voluntary pledges will collectively set us in the right direction to keep the world at or below 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) of warming above pre-industrial levels is a critical question. An equally important question is whether the pledges are perceived as fair, given that the contribution and capacity to tackle this problem varies considerably between countries.Last November’s pact between the world’s largest historic emitter, the United States, and its largest current one, China, sends a crucial message about the importance of working together, while respecting differences.The proposed sustainable development goals reflect a similarly important shift. Unlike the MDGs, these goals and their associated targets will be universal in scope. Poverty is not confined to the developing world. Developed countries are expected to adopt the agenda and take actions to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development within their own borders, as well as ensuring that relevant policies such as those on trade, investment or migration support developing countries in tackling poverty. Finally, all countries will be expected to tackle global challenges, such as climate change, that threaten to exacerbate poverty if left unaddressed.2015 will not answer all questions related to these twin challenges, but it will lay the framework for international cooperation for the next decade. The emerging architecture will require all countries to work together. If designed well, it can set the stage for true transformation that can benefit the hundreds of millions of people still struggling to escape poverty, as well as those facing the mounting threats of climate change. The stakes are high. We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right.last_img read more

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MLB looks at claims Mariners management called Latino players ‘lazy and stupid’

first_imgMajor League Baseball is investigating claims made against the Seattle Mariners by the team’s recently fired training and conditioning director, who said team management had disparaged Latino players.The Mariners denied the allegations in a statement on Monday following Twitter and Instagram posts from Lorena Martin in which she claimed general manager Jerry Dipoto, manager Scott Servais and director of player development Andy McKay had called Latino players “lazy, dumb and stupid, especially the Dominicans.” Lorena Martin (@LMHighPerform)The Mariners organization has issues. The things I’ve witnessed first hand have left me shocked, GM Jerry Dipoto, Manager Scott Servais, and Director of PD Andy McKay speak about players like thisCalling LATINOS, LAZY, DUMB, and STUPID, especially DOMINICANS#discrimination pic.twitter.com/ie5uxyxq15November 12, 2018 The Mariners said Martin, who was hired last year, was relieved of her duties in October. “While it is our policy to not comment on personnel issues, we do feel it is important to respond to the outrageous, false claims made by her today on social media. And to note that Martin did not make any of these false allegations until after she was relieved of her duties,” the Mariners said in a statement. “The Mariners categorically deny that any member of our management or coaching staff made racist remarks regarding any of our players or staff. Additionally, we have not terminated (or threatened to terminate) any trainers during the offseason.”In her posts, Martin called Dipoto a “poor leader” and said the Mariners would not make the playoffs with the current leadership structure. She said her posts were “a glimpse of what I’ve experienced.” In a later comment on Twitter, Martin said there was a breach of contract by the Mariners and she had reported “discriminatory incidences” to human resources and other staff members during the season.“MLB is aware of the allegations made by a former employee of the Seattle Mariners regarding the conduct of club employees. Consistent with our policies, we are investigating the allegations,” the commissioner’s office said in a statement Tuesday. Martin was hired by the Mariners to oversee their entire training and conditioning program. The Mariners created the role for Martin in the hope she could improve the organization’s training practices and help prevent injuries. She had come to Seattle after serving as the director of sports performance analytics for the Los Angeles Lakers. MLB … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Support The Guardian Share on Facebook Baseball Seattle Mariners Share on Messenger Share via Emailcenter_img Since you’re here… news Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest US sports Topics Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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