Parks scores 30, Alab Pilipinas posts first win in ABL

first_imgSenators to proceed with review of VFA EDITORS’ PICK Wesley Hsu paced Kaohsiung, which reeled to 0-3, with 23 points.With a 1-1 record, Alab Pilipinas rose to third in the standings behind the undefeated Slingers (3-0) and league first-timer Hong Kong Eastern Long Lions (2-0).Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Photo from Asean Basketball League Facebook pageAlab Pilipinas drew another stat-stuffing showing from Ray Parks to turn back newcomer Kaohsiung Truth, 92-81, for its first win in the Asean Basketball League Sunday night at Star Arena in Baliuag, Bulacan.Parks dazzled anew with 30 points, seven rebounds, four assists, three steals and two blocks to lead the Philippines, which bounced back from a 71-66 home loss to Singapore last week in Biñan, Laguna.ADVERTISEMENT Tabal claims 4th crown; Agravante nails men’s title Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes MOST READ We are young Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports READ: Visiting Slingers spoil Parks, Alab Pilipinas’ ABL debutThe 23-year-old Parks, a two-time UAAP MVP out of National University, has been doing it all for Alab Pilipinas averaging 24.5 points, 7 rebounds, 4 assists and 2.5 blocks in his first two games.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliAsean import Lawrence Domingo added 21 points on a hot-shooting night while Korean-American import Seung Jun Lee nearly had a double-double with eight points and 12 rebounds for the Philippines.Former University of the Philippines point guard Mikee Reyes made his debut for the Truth. He scored 14 points. Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

Details

Research finds humans across the globe have microplastics in their stool

first_imgAnimals, Environment, Health, Marine Animals, Microplastics, Nature And Health, Plastic, Pollution, Public Health, Research, Wildlife Researchers from the Medical University of Vienna and the Environment Agency Austria monitored eight people in eight different countries and found that every single stool sample collected tested positive for the presence of microplastics.Food processing and plastic food packaging are major sources of microplastics in human diets. Microplastics can also enter the human food chain via marine animals that people consume — significant amounts of microplastics have been found in lobster, shrimp, and tuna, for instance.The researchers found 9 different types of plastic in the human stools they tested — shipped to Vienna in plastic-free containers to be screened at the Environment Agency Austria — with an average of 20 microplastic particles ranging in size from 50 to 500 micrometres found in every 10 grams of stool. A study conducted with participants from across the globe found that every single stool sample collected tested positive for the presence of microplastics.Researchers from the Medical University of Vienna and the Environment Agency Austria monitored eight people in eight different countries — Austria, Finland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, and the UK — and presented their findings at the United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week held in Vienna late last month.Microplastics are small plastic fragments that are less than 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inches) in length. Sources of microplastic pollution in Earth’s environment include cosmetics, clothing, and a variety of other products; they can also be created when larger pieces of plastic, like water and soda bottles or plastic bags, are released into the environment and subsequently break down into smaller pieces through natural weathering processes.A 2015 study found that about 8 million metric tons of plastic waste makes its way from land into Earth’s oceans every year. Scientists are studying the effect this plastic pollution has on marine animals and ecosystems — for instance, research released earlier this year found that microplastic particles can block nutrient absorption and damage the digestive tracts of filter-feeding marine life, while the toxins and persistent organic pollutants found in plastic can change biological processes such as growth and reproduction and even lead to decreased fertility as it accumulates in the bodies of marine wildlife over time.Food processing and plastic food packaging are major sources of microplastics in human diets. Microplastics can also enter the human food chain via marine animals that people consume — significant amounts of microplastics have been found in lobster, shrimp, and tuna, for instance.Dr. Philipp Schwabl, who led the research presented at UEG Week, said he started to wonder how microplastics might be impacting humans after reading about the staggering increase of plastic pollution and high microplastic burden in sea animals. “Many people assume that microplastics are likely to be present also in humans,” he told Mongabay. “However, I couldn’t find any study proving this hypothesis. Thus, I was eager to initiate such an investigation.”While he cautions that it’s necessary to be mindful of the small sample size of the study — just eight participants — Schwabl said he found the results eye-opening nonetheless. “Personally, I did not expect that each sample would be tested positive.”In total, Schwabl and team found 9 different types of plastic in the human stools they tested — shipped to Vienna in plastic-free containers to be screened at the Environment Agency Austria — with an average of 20 microplastic particles ranging in size from 50 to 500 micrometres found in every 10 grams of stool. Polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) were the most common types of plastic found, present in all eight samples.Each study participant kept a food diary for a week before submitting their stool sample and, according to the researchers, the diaries showed that all eight participants were probably exposed to microplastics when they ate foods wrapped in plastic or drank from plastic bottles. None of the participants refrained from eating meat during the study period. Six reported eating seafood.In a statement, Schwabl said of the research and its findings: “This is the first study of its kind and confirms what we have long suspected, that plastics ultimately reach the human gut. Of particular concern is what this means to us, and especially patients with gastrointestinal diseases.”So far, however, there haven’t been any studies examining the health implications of people being exposed to microplastics through their diet. “Indeed, it is a very important question and we are planning further investigations to elucidate the effects of microplastics on human health,” Schwabl told Mongabay. “However, animal studies exist which show that microplastic particles are capable of entering the bloodstream, lymphatic system and may even reach the liver. Furthermore, in animal studies it has been shown that microplastics may cause intestinal damage, remodelling of the intestinal villi, distortion of iron absorption and hepatic stress.”Schwabl said that more studies are needed to determine exactly how ingesting microplastics might affect people: “Now that we have first evidence for microplastics inside humans, we need further research to understand what this means for human health. … [T]he more samples we get the better our understanding will be for human microplastics ingestion and once the sample size is bigger we might find additional correlations between microplastics contamination and place of residence or diets and lifestyle.”Microplastic poses a growing concern in oceans and other aquatic habitat. Now it has been found in human stools, though the implications for human health are not yet well understood. Photo by 5Gyres, courtesy of Oregon State University, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.CITATIONS• Germanov, E. S., Marshall, A. D., Bejder, L., Fossi, M. C., & Loneragan, N. R. (2018). Microplastics: No small problem for filter-feeding megafauna. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. doi:10.1016/j.tree.2018.01.005• Jambeck, J. R., Geyer, R., Wilcox, C., Siegler, T. R., Perryman, M., Andrady, A., … & Law, K. L. (2015). Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean. Science, 347(6223), 768-771. doi:10.1126/science.1260352• Schwabl et al. (2018). Assessment of microplastic concentrations in human stool. Presentation, UEG Week.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Details

Conservation couture: Batik artisans make rhinos a fashion statement

first_imgCampaigners in Indonesia have blended rhino conservation with artisanal batik production to raise awareness about saving the critically endangered species.Under a program started by a conservationist, local batik designers are incorporating rhino motifs into the hand-dyed textiles, in the hope that this will get the public thinking about rhinos.There may be as few as 30 Sumatran rhinos left in the wild, following decades of poaching, habitat loss, and climate-induced forest fragmentation. LAMPUNG, Indonesia — Campaigners in Indonesia are using the country’s celebrated batik-making tradition to get people to think about the Sumatran rhinoceros, a species on the brink of extinction.The critically endangered Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) is the only living species of Dicerorhinus, the most primitive rhino genus, which evolved 15 million to 20 million years ago and includes the prehistoric woolly rhino in its ranks.Habitat loss, climate-induced habitat fragmentation, and poaching have significantly slashed the species’ population, with estimates today ranging from 30 to 100 individuals. One of their last strongholds is Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra’s Lampung province, where a captive-breeding program is underway to shore up the flagging wild population.Lampung is also home to a rich tradition of making batik, a form of hand-dyeing textiles in which the parts not being dyed are masked with beeswax. It was Elly Lestari Rustiati, a rhino expert at Lampung University, who came up with the idea of marrying the two concepts of conservation and batik. Rhino conservation awareness through art isn’t new; in India, artisanal wood-carvers make intricately crafted statuettes of the greater one-horned rhinos (Rhinoceros unicornis) that live in Kaziranga National Park.So Elly introduced her idea to a local batik-making community, touting it as adding value to the textiles that they already produce, alongside the awareness-raising benefits.A woman in Indonesia’s Lampung province dyes batik cloth that features a motif of the region’s Sumatran rhinos. Image courtesy of Hidayatullah.Motifs are a central part of any batik textile, and are unique to the region in which it’s made. For the Lampung batik, it was only natural that the motif would be rhinos.“They were eager and very excited to learn” how to make the rhino motifs, Elly said of the participants, adding that she helped provide information about the species’ characteristics to help them with their depictions of the two-horned animals.It wasn’t as easy a task as it seemed, said Hidayatullah, 31, the owner of the Andanan Batik store in Lampung’s Pesawaran district.“It was difficult at first. [The motif] didn’t look like a Sumatran rhino,” he said.He said his initial attempts ended up looking more like the one-horned Javan rhinoceros, another critically endangered species native to Indonesia. But Hidayatullah persisted, and today his textiles bear the proud silhouettes of little Sumatran rhinos, as well as faithful reproductions of some of the plants the animal feeds on.Hidayatullah said his determination to get the process right was inspired by his child’s interest in learning more about the creature taking shape amid the wax coatings on the textiles. As part of his education, the batik maker visited the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas to study the distinctive outline of the animal.Getting the artisans to come up with motifs that did justice to the two-horned Sumatran rhino was difficult at first, with early results resembling the one-horned Javan rhino. Image courtesy of Hidayatullah.Elly said she hoped the rhino batik would help raise awareness of rhino conservation, given the ubiquity of batik throughout Indonesia. “Hopefully for the batik makers in Lampung this initiative will be a mix between cultural and scientific values. That way, the community’s batik works will have added value and their own uniqueness,” she said.The popularity of the rhino motif has caught on. In neighboring East Lampung district, local designers stamp out hundreds of sheets of the special batik each month, some of which have been fashioned into uniforms for district officials.An artisan of the old school, Hidayatullah eschews the mass-printing model and instead makes his batik to order. (As a marketer of the new school, he promotes his work through Instagram.) He sells a sheet of rhino-motif batik, measuring 1.2 by 2.2 meters (47 by 87 inches) for 300,000 rupiah ($21), and a ready-to-wear batik shirt for 450,000 rupiah ($32).“There’s a special pride that I feel from helping introduce this rhino to the whole world through batik,” Hidayatullah said.A female Sumatran rhino with her calf in Way Kambas, Sumatra, Indonesia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Jan. 31, 2019.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Conservation Solutions, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Habitat Loss, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Megafauna, Poaching, Rainforest Animals, Rhinos, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

Details