A Vision for the UN Panel For Global Sustainability

first_imgOn October 20, I spoke at an Interactive Dialogue of the UN General Assembly about the imminent report of the High Level Panel for Global Sustainability. The Panel, convened by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, is charged with articulating a new vision for sustainable growth and prosperity. Its report, due at the end of 2011, will set the tone for intergovernmental action in the coming years, including at the 2012 Rio+20 Earth Summit.With a roster of current and former world leaders (including Mrs. Tarja Halonen, President of Finland and Mr. Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa) the Panel is uniquely positioned to set an agenda for green growth and prosperity. As I say in my remarks below, we already know what we need to do to promote sustainability. The real question lies in how to move forward and overcome both the political and behavioral hurdles that have hampered progress so far. Can the Panel craft a vision that is ambitious, politically realistic, and persuasive to the larger public? We need to retire the misleading formulations – such as the environment versus development. Growth versus limits. Jobs versus public health. Our narrative must make clear that growth, security, equity and most importantly poverty alleviation are all possible in the pursuit of sustainability. By 2025, 1.8 billion people will be living in countries or regions with absolute water scarcity, and two-thirds of the world population could be under water stress conditions.When it comes to climate change, 2010 was tied with 2005 as the warmest year on record. The concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere already exceeds 390ppm when many scientists argue that the threshold should be 350 ppm.If we are already exceeding the limits on what the planet can sustain given the size of today’s economy, how will the planet be able to cope with the global economy in 2050 when it will be four times as large as today?A former colleague of mine, Robert Repetto, summed up this challenge by saying: “If you believe that we can continue to grow the economy exponentially over the next 50 years without hitting nature’s limits, then you’re either a madman or an economist.”2. The Politics of SustainabilityThe unique contribution of this report will not lie in answering questions of “what”? Such as: what reforms need to occur in agriculture, water or other sectors to promote sustainability? Or: what new skills are needed or what new institutions need to be established? Many others are tackling such technical questions. And I suspect there is actually not much new to be said here.The real contribution is in the “how”. How do we get difficult reforms to actually happen? How do we navigate entrenched interests and established norms of behavior?This focus allows the panel to leverage its greatest asset – which is that its members are current or former elected political leaders. They can speak legitimately about how to overcome the political hurdles in advancing sustainability.Here are examples of the issues that I believe the report needs to address:Tradeoffs:One of biggest challenges is managing tradeoffs – tradeoffs between groups, between the short-term and the long-term, between geographies, between generations. How do we make those tradeoffs? And how do we ensure that there these tradeoffs are “politically sustainable” – that constituencies support difficult decisions over time?Our experience suggests that providing information and engaging the public improves the quality, legitimacy and durability of decisions. The tradeoffs of any decision become clearer when informed stakeholders are brought to the table. A concrete and important recommendation to come out of this report would be to improve public access to information, participation and justice. It’s a fitting time to advocate for widespread adoption of these access rights, which were enshrined at the Earth Summit in Rio 20 years ago.Transitions:There will be losers. How they are dealt with, whether they are dealt with fairly is critical to advancing sustainability. The transition from a high-carbon to low carbon growth path is the stated goal of many countries. How can countries transition the people working in these industries, and the related financial interests behind them, to new growth opportunities?The Panel must describe ways in which countries can make this transition successfully, to fairly deal with those who are affected, by providing real-world examples of what works.3. PersuasionAs I look around this room, I imagine that it is a fairly receptive audience – people who understand the stakes involved, and the critical need for a path forward to sustainability. But when I travel to many places in the world, people have very different perspectives, beliefs and priorities.Of course you know this. But my point is: we need to focus much more on messengers and narratives. No matter how compelling the evidence and arguments in the report, the world will not budge without diverse and credible messengers who can articulate unforgettable narratives.All too often we talk about sustainability in ways that appeal to environmentalists but not to the mainstream. We preach to the choir. For this report, we need to enlist unexpected voices that come from unlikely sectors. Frankly, I believe that the messengers are more important than the message. We need support from those who have the ability to persuade those who we cannot persuade – representatives from business, the faith and scientific communities, farmers, and young people. And of course we need civil society organizations.How can we be more effective in re-framing the narrative around sustainability – as critical for reducing poverty, creating jobs and catalyzing growth? How do we engage voters and consumers sitting on the fence who are not committed to sustainability?We also need to retire for good the misleading formulations – such as the environment versus development. Growth versus limits. Jobs versus public health. Our narrative must make clear that growth, security, equity and most importantly poverty alleviation are all possible in the pursuit of sustainability.We are seeing more and more people take to the streets to have their voices heard about inequity and unacceptable imbalances in power and economics. From the Arab Spring to Liberty Square in this city, there is a thirst for a new world.These social and political movements remind me of a quote from Nelson Mandela that applies well to the challenges before us: “It always seems impossible until it’s done.”center_img Recently, the Martin Luther King Memorial opened near my home in Washington, DC. Dr. King profoundly changed the history of the United States. His brilliance was his ability to articulate a clear, bold vision for equality – a vision so compelling that it moved both people and institutions to an entirely different place.I hope the Global Sustainability Panel articulates a similarly bold and compelling vision for sustainability – a vision that is able to move political and business leaders to see sustainability not as a necessary cost but as essential to reducing poverty and stimulating growth.Turning to the forthcoming report, I would like to make three points that I believe will be critical if the Panel is to fulfill its mandate:1. AmbitionThe Report must be bold given the scale and urgency of the issues. We live in a US$63 trillion global economy and we are already severely damaging the ecosystems on which all life depends. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment – a 5 year global study conducted under the auspices of the UN – found that approximately 60% of the world’s ecosystems are being degraded or used unsustainably.last_img read more

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Final Days at Rio+20: Measuring Progress So Far

first_imgRio+20 has not quite concluded, but we’re rapidly approaching the end line. Somewhat unexpectedly, the Rio+20 outcome document was largely finalized yesterday afternoon. NGOs have weighed in on what this means, and most are rightfully frustrated. Almost across the board, the document is much too soft and vague to solve today’s sustainability challenges. Much of the text is merely a reaffirmation of previous agreements or worse, a regression from those agreements.That said, we’ve believed all along that the more groundbreaking action at Rio+20 would be outside of the formal process. Certainly, after attending many side events and informal meetings this week, I’ve come across numerous examples of civil society organizations, entrepreneurs, companies, and others who are moving forward with innovative approaches to address sustainability. Perhaps more importantly, outside of Rio, many national and local governments are genuinely pushing ahead on sustainability in exciting ways.The picture at Rio is much like the world today: complex, incremental and not rising to the challenges in front of us. This raises at least two important questions: Why isn’t the outcome text stronger? And where are the signs of hope?On the text, there are core challenges that are standing in the way of more progress in Rio:First off, the world is facing financial, economic and political crises on several levels. This shouldn’t be an excuse for inaction, but it is a reality right now.Second, these global issues are highly complex and resist easy answers– especially when considering that the old construct of developed-versus-developing countries is a gross oversimplification of a more fluid reality today.Third, strong interests are holding back progress on many key issues. These include some governments, businesses, and others with vested interests that prefer to hang on to the status quo rather than advance change in the world. This was most clear earlier this week when world leaders failed to respond to the groundswell of voices that pushed to cut global fossil fuel subsidies.If you combine complexity with vested interests and add unanimity in decision-making, it’s a recipe for the lowest common denominator. Given these conditions, it’s far easier to block action than to make progress.On the global level, this points to the need to be sharper about what we want to achieve at international gatherings and the process to get there. While some of the UN Conventions have a greater sense of purpose due to the more limited nature of the issues they are dealing with (e.g. UNFCCC), the challenges at Rio loom large.So, while the text is far from ideal and has been watered down in many ways, where are the signs of hope?Here are three places in the text to find progress:Sustainable Development Goals: The inclusion of Sustainable Development Goals in the final text represents an important outcome from Rio+20 that potentially will help shape the global development agenda of the future. Many questions remain. As we’ve argued before—and now identified in the text— a key question to be settled post-Rio is how the SDGs will move toward a one-track process in line with the emerging global dialogue on defining the post-2015 development agenda. This work will start with the UN Secretary General’s high-level panel on post-2015.Governance and Principle 10: The role of governance, which is sometimes overlooked, is a key area to ensure that people have rights and governments are held accountable for their words. The text provides support for Principle 10, which was enshrined at the original Rio+20 Summit, giving hope for advancement. This is a positive sign that will help bring increased transparency and accountability to environmental issues. We are also pleased that countries have made commitments to improve the consultative role of civil society in intergovernmental processes, mandated UNEP to explore new mechanisms to ensure citizen participation and transparency, and encouraged action at the regional and national level. Chile also announced that several Latin American countries are committing to explore a regional convention on Principle 10.Transportation: In the past, transport has not been considered in sustainability discussions, but now we’re seeing transport rising up on the agenda. As the global middle class expands and becomes more urban, we’re currently heading toward a world with more cars, more congestion, more pollution, and related challenges. It’s vital that we respond to these transport and urbanization challenges, and the inclusion of strong, mass public transit language in the Rio+20 outcome is a step forward.Other Meaningful CommitmentsOutside of the formal process, we’ve seen a few other meaningful commitments coming out of Rio+20. These include efforts by officials and ordinary people who are pushing to advance key values: increased transparency, improved governance, more innovation, better measurement, and more.Here are a just couple of important announcements from this week:Mayor Bloomberg, President Clinton, and C40 announced important progress for cities to address sustainable urbanization. As Mayor Bloomberg said, “cities are on the front line of climate change,” along with other environmental issues. C40 cities are on track to cut emissions by 248 million tons by 2020 and could reach one billion tons by 2030. WRI is working to create healthier and more livable cities on many levels, including improving design, expanding bus-rapid-transit, and helping cities to measure and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.Another significant outcome was today’s announcement by eight multilateral development banks to provide $175 billion over 10 years in support of sustainable transport worldwide. As my colleague Holger Dalkmann said, this is a potential “game changer” for sustainable transportation worldwide, moving it squarely into the core of the sustainability agenda.More Progress NeededOne area where we would like to see more progress is around sustainable business. At several events this week, businesses at Rio were unable to grasp the fundamental recognition that the planet is on an unsustainable course and the window for action is closing. We were disappointed to find that most of the talk seemed to restate the basics, but failed to produce transformational ideas about how we can shift course in time. One notable exception was the Natural Capital Leadership Compact signed by 15 global companies, which urged action to properly value and maintain the Earth’s natural capital.Of course, as we’ve argued before, business will only go so far on its own. Governments have an important role to play. They need to set the right policies and incentives, including putting a price on what we as society value. With such policies in place, business can embrace bolder action to innovate and scale up solutions.So, as world leaders continue to arrive at Rio+20, it’s time for them to step up, raise their level of ambition, and follow-through on their words with concrete steps and actions that will truly move the world forward on sustainability.last_img read more

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WRI Merilis Data Terbaru Terkait Kebakaran Hutan Di Indonesia

first_imgDari peta-peta ini, WRI telah mentabulasikan jumlah peringatan titik api berdasarkan tanggal, serta mengidentifikasi jumlah peringatan yang terjadi di dalam dan di luar area konsesi. Artikel ini telah disunting untuk mengklarifikasi penggunaan data peringatan titik api NASA. Klik disini untuk mengetahui lebih lanjut tentang system ini. Berikut adalah tabel terbaru yang menunjukkan konsesi yang menjadi lokasi peringatan titik api berdasarkan data konsesi 2013.Observasi BaruData baru menggarisbawahi dua pola kunci:Jumlah peringatan titik api di Indonesia masih tetap tinggi, menunjukkan bahwa kebakaran di lapangan masih menjadi isu yang serius. Sebagaimana ditunjukkan data NASA, jumlah peringatan titik api paling tinggi terjadi pada 19 Juni dimana memang terdapat peristiwa kebakaran hutan dan lahan yang paling tinggi jika dibandingkan dengan hari-hari lain. Hari-hari selanjutnya masih menunjukkan angka peringatan titik api yang relatif lebih tinggi, dengan 21 dan 23 Juni di posisi kedua dan ketiga tertinggi.Persentase peringatan titik api yang terjadi di wilayah konsesi perusahaan meningkat jika dibandingkan dengan beberapa hari lalu. Untuk periode 12-23 Juni, semakin meningginya jumlah titik api diiringi dengan meningkatnya proporsi peringatan titik api yang terdapat dalam wilayah konsesi.Meskipun data baru ini telah membantu ditemukannya pola di atas, data ini masih belum cukup lengkap. Peta konsesi untuk 2013 masih belum dapat diakses publik dan tidak bisa diakses online dengan gratis. Padahal data ini maupun data lain yang serupa, seperti kepemilikan perusahaan, dapat memperkuat kemampuan kelompok-kelompok yang bekerja dalam isu ini, termasuk pemerintah, untuk membuat analisis.Jika pemerintah Indonesia, perusahaan, dan komunitas dapat bekerja sama untuk memastikan ketersediaan data tersebut secara publik, langkah ini menjadi usaha penting yang dapat mencegah krisis kebakaran hutan di masa mendatang, sekaligus memastikan masa depan yang lebih lestari bagi hutan dan masyarakat Indonesia.center_img Cecelia Song, Andika Putraditama, Andrew Leach, Ariana Alisjahbana, Lisa Johnston, James Anderson dan ahli lainnya di WRI juga berkontribusi dalam artikel ini.Read this post in English here.Hari Jumat yang lalu, World Resources Institute (WRI) mempublikasikan data detil terkait lokasi peringatan titik api di Sumatera yang telah menyebabkan kabut asap yang sangat mengganggu dan berpotensi beracun di wilayah Indonesia, Singapura, dan Malaysia. Pemerintah ketiga negara, perusahaan-perusahaan, maupun media semua berlomba untuk mencari data untuk memahami penyebab dan lokasi sebaran titik api, serta memutuskan siapa yang seharusnya bertanggung jawab.Selama beberapa hari terakhir ini, WRI telah melacak lokasi sebaran kebakaran hutan dan lahan yang terjadi di Sumatera, sebuah pulau di bagian barat Indonesia. Dalam perkembangan terbaru ini, WRI menganalisis tren historis kebakaran hutan yang terjadi di Sumatera. Baca analisa sebelumnya.Analisis terbaru dari WRI menunjukkan adanya perkembangan sebaran peringatan titik api di Sumatera dari waktu ke waktu serta kaitannya dengan konsesi perusahaan. Dua data penting dalam analisis ini antara lain:1. Peringatan titik api baru dari Data Api Aktif NASA, yang menunjukkan sebaran peringatan titik api terbaru selama periode 20-23 Juni (sebelumnya hanya pada 12-20 Juni. Data NASA hanya mengindikasikan kemungkinan lokasi ternjadinya kebarakan. Untuk mengetahui apakah ada api atau tidak, data tersebut harus diverifikasi di lapangan. Lihat disini untuk informasi lebih lanjut tentang data NASA.)Peta konsesi dan penggunaan lahan terbaru dari Kementerian Kehutanan Republik Indonesia, tertanggal 2013.Versi terbaru dari Peta Interaktif kami menenunjukkan peta tumpang tindih dari kedua data terbaru tersebut.Catatan: Visualisasi di bawah ini bersumber dari data yang tersedia bagi publik dari NASA dan Pemerintah Indonesia. Para ahli di WRI telah melakukan usaha terbaik mereka untuk melakukan verifikasi terhadap informasi ini, namun tidak dapat mengkonfirmasi akurasi dari informasi awal tersebut.last_img read more

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What do Apple, Citi and Shell Have in Common?

first_imgThis blog post was originally published for Forbes on February 23, 2015.Everywhere you look, renewable energy is in the news this year. Corporate leaders like Apple, Google and GM are making significant new investments – blink and you may miss the latest deal. While I included falling clean energy prices as one of 2014’s biggest stories, it’s becoming clear this is a longer-term trend.Surprisingly, players like Shell and BP are signaling the shift to low-carbon energy is a serious proposition. Both have endorsed shareholder resolutions demanding the companies test whether their business models are compatible with limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius.But the swelling ranks of corporate entities, including fossil fuels companies, aren’t just doing this for the good of the earth; it’s smart business, too. As renewable energy comes to scale, early movers will have an advantage.Let’s take a closer look at some of the recent developments:1) Industry Leaders Embracing Clean EnergyApple’s $848 million investment in First Solar’s California Flats project grabbed headlines for good reason. Apple’s California operations will now run on solar energy, following similar investments to supply their Arizona data centers with 100 percent renewables.But Apple is far from alone:Google signed long-term contracts for 43 megawatts (MW) of wind energy to help power its California headquarters with 100 percent clean energy, adding to the $1.5 billion already invested in renewables.Citigroup just unveiled a $100 billion, 10-year commitment to finance renewables and energy efficiency, cut greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change impacts.Kaiser Permanente agreed to buy more than 150 MW of wind and solar power, and to install 70 MW of solar arrays at its California facilities through NRG Energy.Amazon announced it would invest in a new 150 MW wind farm to power its data centers in Indiana.General Motors will build a 34 MW wind farm to power Mexico manufacturing facilities, and when completed, will derive more than 12 percent of total North American energy supply from renewables.Twenty-five of the world’s biggest brands, representing enough renewable energy demand to power 1.1 million homes, underscored this trend by signing the Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers’ Principles (with WWF and WRI as facilitators) to create new opportunities to purchase renewable electricity from utilities and energy suppliers.Of course, corporate reputation is one of the drivers, but falling renewable energy prices are also creating opportunities to save money on utility bills. Locking in long-term, stable power prices improves bottom lines.2) Big Oil Sending New SignalsShifting energy supply from volatile-priced fossil fuels makes sense for large electricity consumers, but it’s a pleasant surprise to see growing acceptance for the importance of low-carbon power from some of the world’s biggest traditional energy firms.Royal Dutch Shell’s CEO Ben van Beurden recently urged the oil industry to support climate change measures, including carbon pricing and a shift away from coal toward natural gas, saying, “I’m well aware that the industry’s credibility is an issue. Stereotypes that fail to see the benefits our industry brings to the world are short-sighted. But we must also take a critical look at ourselves.”Following Shell, BP also called for shareholder resolutions to be more transparent around climate risks. Norway’s sovereign wealth fund (the world’s biggest) also took action, removing 32 coal companies from its portfolio amid an overall divestment shift away from fossil fuel firms.This shift comes against the backdrop of plummeting oil prices. The dramatic decline in oil prices makes this an opportune time to reduce fossil fuel subsidies and even establish a carbon tax. A revenue-neutral carbon tax could help improve the quality of growth in many countries worldwide.3) Renewables Prices Keep Falling—Spurring More Global GrowthEven without a global carbon price, renewable energy prices are rapidly declining through technological innovations, market competition and private investment. IRENA reported in January renewable power generation prices are now at cost parity with or below fossil fuel generation in many parts of the world, led by a 75 percent price decline in solar panels since 2009.A growing number of countries are betting on renewables. India recently set an ambitious target of 100 GW of solar power by 2022,and a number of companies, including ones from the United States and China, have made significant commitments to enter this market of 1.2 billion people.China was once again the largest investor in clean energy last year, reaching nearly $90 billion in investment. Meanwhile, the United States invested almost $52 billion during 2014, with employment in solar growing 20 times faster than the overall economy, and leading some analysts to suggest that solar could soon have a similar impact on U.S. energy markets as the shale revolution.Growing Sense of InevitabilityTogether, these actions add to the growing sense of inevitably for a global shift toward low-carbon energy.It’s too early to say we’ve hit a tipping point, but when big players from big tech to big oil all start to move, it certainly feels like perhaps the times are a changin’.last_img read more

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US Has Bold Plan to Stall Climate Change

first_imgThis post originally appeared on CNN.In baseball, there’s a traditional comeback after a tough season: “Wait ’til next year!” For climate change “next year” is now. This year is the time and the United Nations’ international climate negotiations in Paris in December are the place to secure strong global agreement to curb heat-trapping emissions. A successful climate pact will send a signal around the world that a shift to a low-carbon economy is underway.The United States has made clear that it is ready to step up to the plate on climate change. The U.S. administration on Tuesday unveiled details about its proposal to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 26 percent to 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025. This common-sense and achievable plan to decarbonize the U.S. economy will result in significant cost savings from cleaner technologies and create more American energy jobs to power our homes and businesses.This is an area where the United States needs to lead, and doing so will create a better planet for our children and a more prosperous future for our country.The United States isn’t alone in this global climate effort. In a landmark joint announcement with the United States in November, China unveiled its intent to peak its carbon emissions around 2030 and to double its share of zero-carbon energy to 20 percent. This shift will require substantial effort from China to retool its economy, increase investment in renewable energy and divest from coal. As the world’s No. 1 investor in renewable energy, China has already taken important steps forward.At the same time, India has set the audacious goal of installing 100 gigawatts of solar power capacity by 2022, a 30-fold increase from current levels and eight times more solar capacity than the United States has today.Cities and corporations are joining in as well. More than 200 cities, home to 436 million people, have voluntarily committed to saving 13 gigatons of greenhouse gas emissions by midcentury. And more than a thousand companies, along with 73 countries, voiced support for putting a price on carbon and moving to cleaner energy technologies. Leading companies, like Apple and Google, are making major bets on renewable energy. And another 25 businesses have signed onto the Corporate Renewable Energy Buyers’ Principles—these companies represent energy demand equal to more than 1 million homes.Increasing examples demonstrate that strong climate action can be good for the economy. For instance, renewable sources now provide one-fifth of the world’s electricity, while solar manufacturing costs have dropped 80 percent in the last seven years. Wind turbines installed now are 100 times better at generating power than turbines were 30 years ago. Clean technology investments surged to $310 billion last year. In the United States, carbon emissions fell by 10 percent from 2007 to 2013, the largest absolute emissions reduction recorded, even as the United States has recovered from the Great Recession.Many of these shifts are unprecedented and could not have been anticipated even five years ago. Yet these trends alone are not enough to counter the mounting climate-related impacts that we are already seeing. A global climate agreement in Paris this December can send more signals to markets and drive more ambitious climate action for decades to come.A Paris agreement would represent a new form of international cooperation and a fundamental change in the global approach to climate action — a shift from burden-sharing to the creation of mutual opportunities; from cost to investment; from economic threat to a spur to economic development.With the United States showing the way, and with cooperation from other countries, businesses, investors, cities and citizens, we can achieve a prosperous and secure future for all.Each year, baseball returns and hope springs eternal. Now, it’s time for all countries to get in the game.last_img read more

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Getting It Right: A New Global Model to Tackle Poverty and Climate Change

first_imgThis commentary on originally appeared online at DevexThe international community has a rare opportunity in 2015 to confront two linked global challenges: extreme poverty and climate change.In September, the United Nations is expected to agree on a new agenda aimed at eradicating poverty and advancing sustainable development. In December, climate negotiators will gather in Paris, France, to reach an agreement to accelerate the shift to a low-carbon economy and strengthen resilience to climate change.Success this year will depend on whether or not we can develop a new model for international cooperation that is universal — including all countries — yet differentiated — recognizing differences between countries.Twenty years ago, the development and climate communities divided countries into two groups — rich and poor — and specified who needed to do what. Today, such a binary distinction is much less relevant given the rapidly changing economic and political context.The Solutions We NeedWhat we need are solutions that involve all countries but that respect the differing levels of responsibility and the capacity of individual countries to respond to these twin challenges.The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, established in 1992, led to the Kyoto Protocol and binding targets among developed countries to curb greenhouse gas emissions. The protocol reflected the thinking of its time: It divided the world into developed countries that needed to cut carbon pollution and developing ones that did not. Economic development and emissions profiles have changed dramatically since then and an agreement that only expects cuts from developed countries will ultimately fail to prevent catastrophic warming.The story is similar for efforts to reduce poverty. The Millennium Development Goals, launched in 2001, imagined a world where developing countries could improve the lives of their poorest citizens, with developed countries providing aid and other support. While income poverty — the number of people living on $1.25 a day or less — has been significantly reduced, with impressive gains made in providing basic education and health services, there is now recognition that eradicating extreme poverty will require more than just aid and good domestic policy. It will also require a broader suite of actions from all countries — and across economic, social and environmental realms.What is the architecture we need for international cooperation in this new world? And how can we ensure that the commitments countries make, in aggregate, are sufficiently ambitious to tackle these two challenges and be sufficiently fair to ensure global engagement?We are starting to see the outlines of a new model for just this kind of international cooperation.From Top-Down to Bottom-UpThe next international climate agreement will shift from a top-down, legally binding system that specifies how much each developed country must reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to a bottom-up approach where all countries — developed and developing — determine their own level of commitment.Whether these voluntary pledges will collectively set us in the right direction to keep the world at or below 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F) of warming above pre-industrial levels is a critical question. An equally important question is whether the pledges are perceived as fair, given that the contribution and capacity to tackle this problem varies considerably between countries.Last November’s pact between the world’s largest historic emitter, the United States, and its largest current one, China, sends a crucial message about the importance of working together, while respecting differences.The proposed sustainable development goals reflect a similarly important shift. Unlike the MDGs, these goals and their associated targets will be universal in scope. Poverty is not confined to the developing world. Developed countries are expected to adopt the agenda and take actions to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development within their own borders, as well as ensuring that relevant policies such as those on trade, investment or migration support developing countries in tackling poverty. Finally, all countries will be expected to tackle global challenges, such as climate change, that threaten to exacerbate poverty if left unaddressed.2015 will not answer all questions related to these twin challenges, but it will lay the framework for international cooperation for the next decade. The emerging architecture will require all countries to work together. If designed well, it can set the stage for true transformation that can benefit the hundreds of millions of people still struggling to escape poverty, as well as those facing the mounting threats of climate change. The stakes are high. We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right.last_img read more

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Best ever Test match I have played in: Sourav Ganguly recalls historic 2001 Eden Gardens Test

first_imgExactly 18 years ago, VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid paved the way for arguably India’s greatest ever victory in Test cricket. At the Eden Gardens, Laxman and Dravid hauled India out of the pits with a 376-run partnership. It was on March 14, 2001 that VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid essayed two of the most iconic knocks in Test cricket.At the start of Day 4 (March 14), India were 254 for 4. Laxman was unbeaten on 109 and Dravid was batting on the overnight score of 7. Australia were still overwhelming favourites to win the Test and clinch the series before the team set out for the final match in Chennai.But Laxman and Dravid had other plans. On March 14, 2001, the two men battled the heat and humidity of Kolkata and added 335 runs through the day. They did not allow Australia a single breakthrough. Laxman was unbeaten in 275 while Dravid had moved to 155 not out.On March 15, Laxman was set to become the first Indian to score a triple hundred in Test cricket but he fell to Glenn McGrath for 281. Dravid would go on to score 180. Harbhajan Singh ripped through the Australian batting line-up with a six-wicket haul as India stormed to a 171-run win, A few days later, India won the Chennai Test to clinch a historic series win.Ganguly, who was captain of the Indian team then, said the Eden Gardens Test was the best ever he was part of.The best ever test match I have played inSourav Ganguly (@SGanguly99) March 14, 2019Speaking at India Today Conclave South last year, said he had learnt a lot of life lessons during his epic knock in Kolkata in 2001.advertisement”I don’t mind that because everyone will remember that Test match. Whenever anyone talks about that 281, they will remember that Test match. And as I have said n number of times, I have learnt a lot of life lessons during that Test match and during that partnership with Rahul Dravid. The number one takeaway from that Test match was to never give up,” Laxman said at India Today Conclave South.”You know the situation we were in.. 274 runs behind, three days to go. To come back from that situation and go on to win the Test match and eventually the series was a great learning experience for all of us.”I am glad people remember that 281 but I always tell people that 281 is an unlucky number for me because I got out on 281 but I am happy people remember that knock and the Test match.”And it’s not only the Indian team, when you talk to the Australian team, they will tell you that it was probably the most competitive Test series they were part of in the last 20 or 30 years. It was a great opportunity for me and for the entire team to do something special for our country,” Laxman said.last_img read more

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KING RESPONDS TO ZERO RATING FROM ANIMAL RIGHTS GROUP

first_imgCongressman Steve King has joined fellow Iowans Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst as a recipients of a score of zero on the U.S. Humane Society’s latest Congressional scorecard.The annual scorecard is used by the national organization to assess each member of Congress’s record in voting on what King refers to as their “activist animal-rights agenda”.King marked his perfect score against the “Vegan Lobby” by releasing his pheasant soup recipe to the public.He says any hungry members of the Humane Society who might wish may avail themselves of it.Steve King’s Traditional Pheasant Soup:Ingredients: 3 pheasants, personally hunted, plucked and skinned; water; 3 teaspoons salt; Iowa sweet corn; chopped celery; egg noodles; chicken broth, chopped carrots.Directions: Place pheasants in a kettle with water. Add salt.  Cook until done. Strain pheasants. Discard liquid. Separate pheasant meat from bone. Add all remaining ingredients including broth, shredded pheasant meat, and Iowa sweet corn, except for egg noodles.Let simmer for at least an hour. Add egg noodles ten minutes before serving. Add chicken broth as needed.last_img read more

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Mike Gundy, Mike Yurcich Praise Mason Rudolph For Pitt Performance

first_imgThe “Rudolph ain’t that great” truthers are out in full force on Sunday the day after No. 2 set the school record for passing yards in a game. It’s stunning really. And maybe this is all our fault. Maybe we set the bar so high for Mason Rudolph that anything short of him being a top 10 pick in the NFL Draft next year was going to feel mediocre. I wrote about this more at length here.I don’t think Rudolph is perfect or that he doesn’t have a lot to work on, but man, some of you act like he’s Aso Pogi or Donovan Woods! Mason Rudolph is probably going to go down as one of the two best QBs in school history. Him and Weeden. That’s it. He’s 14-4 (*15-3*) as a starter and could become the only current B12 QB with wins over every B12 team if he beats Baylor next week.Was he elite on Saturday? No, but he was pretty good. And apparently his “pretty good” games are record-setting performances. Everybody gets caught up in the sailed passes over the middle, and they are certainly there. But what you forget is him throwing 25-yard outs off the wrong foot like everyone in college football does it. I can promise you everyone in college football does not do that.He’s 14-4 as a starter with an average offensive line (at best), no run game and a below average defense.Don’t take my word for it though.“Mason came back,” said Mike Gundy. “It’s tough being a quarterback when you lose a game like that [against CMU]. It’s tough being a head coach when you lose a game like that. He rallied back, so he did a nice job. Unlike last week where I said [he] struggled, he played pretty good today. He missed a few throws. I think he missed maybe three, but overall his accuracy today was tremendous on deep balls.”Not sure about the three missed throws. But the deep balls were there for the most part. And that’s not a gimmick offense if it works 50 percent of the time. It’s just an offense.“He played great,” added Mike Yurcich. “There’s always room to improve. He should sit back and enjoy this one. He played tremendous at the end. He finished strong again with the game-winning drive, which is becoming commonplace for him. I’m proud of him and proud of everyone else too.“I said it to you guys a million times, but the kid is poised,” Yurcich told the Tulsa World. “You’re not going to see him get real hot. You’re not going to see him get real emotional. And that’s a key to his success.”It is. I haven’t counted the 4th quarter game-winning drives, but I believe we are up to six or seven now. Three games into his junior year. Still there are flaws. Rudolph needs to be better than 57 percent in accuracy, and some of those sailed throws are going to start becoming picks in Big 12 play. He knows that. Gundy knows it too.“I think he’s pressing too much,” said of the issues Rudolph has encountered. “When you’re 20 or 21, and people talk about you being a potential first or second round draft pick. Then people make judgments or decisions on you, your ability to run, your deep ball, your arm strength and all of that. I think it affected him. I think he got caught up in some of that and he started pressing. We wanted him to know that we believe in him and that he needs to go play. The rest of it is going to take care of itself.”This goes back to the Colin Kaepernick thing for me. You can hold two truths in your hand at one time. Rudolph can be both a great college QB and still have a lot of things to work on. It’s not all or nothing. It’s just not. It’s not “he’s the worst” or “he’s the best.” The reality is that he’s a tremendous college football quarterback who has some adjustments to make going into Big 12 play. Historically as an OSU fan this is beyond where we have been with our quarterbacks.So no, Mason Rudolph has not been the best quarterback in the country over the first three weeks of 2016, and he had a bad game last week that kept OSU from rolling CMU. That’s disappointing. But it doesn’t mean he’s not one of the best in OSU history. And that thought, heading into conference play, is exciting. If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

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Draxler not on Bayern’s radar

first_imgTransfers Bayern Munich president Hoeness rules out Draxler transfer Peter Hanson Last updated 2 years ago 17:22 8/30/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) JulianDraxler - cropped Bongarts Transfers Bayern München PSG Ligue 1 Bundesliga The Germany international has been linked with a move away from PSG following Neymar’s arrival, but Bayern’s president has played down a transfer Julian Draxler is not a transfer target for Bayern Munich as Die Roten are already well stocked in forward positions, president Uli Hoeness has said.Germany international Draxler joined Paris Saint-Germain in January and impressed at Parc des Princes with four goals in 12 Ligue 1 appearances last term.PSG 13/2 to win the Champions League Article continues below Editors’ Picks Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina However, the arrival of Neymar from Barcelona and the imminent signing of Monaco’s teenage prodigy Kylian Mbappe is set to leave the attacking midfielder down Unai Emery’s pecking order and there are reports PSG are prepared to cash in to balance the books.Premier League duo Liverpool and Arsenal are reportedly long-term admirers, while Bundesliga champions Bayern have been credited with an interest.But Hoeness does not a see a spot in Carlo Ancelotti’s squad for Draxler – who has spoken of his desire to remain in the French capital – and believes it would also ask more unneeded questions about Thomas Muller’s future at Allianz Arena.”Karl-Heinz Rummenigge and I have recently been together and talked about what a mixture of class players we already have in this squad,” he told Bild.”If we were going to make a transfer like Draxler, the next question would be the same as in the case of James’ [Rodriguez] commitment – what about Thomas Muller?”It is clear that Julian Draxler is a player who would be a good match for Bayern, but we do not want to sell any of our players. I also already have bellyache if all our players our fit.”last_img read more

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Tolisso stars as Bayern beat PSG

first_imgBayern Munich 3 Paris Saint-Germain 1: Tolisso & Coman deny PSG perfect group record Nicholas McGee Last updated 1 year ago 05:51 12/6/17 CorentinTolisso-Cropped Bongarts Bayern Munich handed Paris Saint-Germain their first Champions League loss of the season, as Thiago Silva limped off injured. Paris Saint-Germain missed the chance to finish the Champions League group stage with a 100 per cent record as they suffered a 3-1 defeat at Bayern Munich.Bayern’s 3-0 defeat at the Parc des Princes in the reverse fixture in September marked the end of the Carlo Ancelotti era at the Allianz Arena and Die Roten fans may now see that painful evening as a blessing as PSG’s star-studded forward line was delivered a lesson in ruthlessness by Jupp Heynckes’ men.Kylian Mbappe and Neymar spurned chances for PSG while Edinson Cavani, save for a neat touch to set up Mbappe for the goal that cut Bayern’s lead to 2-1, struggled to make a lasting impression. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player By marked contrast Bayern needed little invitation to take full advantage of their attacking openings, Robert Lewandowski’s opener and a brace from former Lyon midfielder Corentin Tolisso doing the damage.For all PSG’s lavish spending, there was some irony in the fact Kingsley Coman, who they allowed to join Juventus in 2014, supplied the assist for the opener and the goal that put the game to bed.A disappointing evening for the Ligue 1 leaders was compounded by Thiago Silva being forced off through injury, but PSG can at least console themselves with top spot in Group B, second-placed Bayern unable to record the four-goal margin of victory needed to leapfrog them.3 – Corentin Tolisso has been involved in 3 of Bayern’s last 4 goals in the Champions League (2 goals, 1 assist). Precious. pic.twitter.com/jv0ZD1GHQF — OptaJean (@OptaJean) December 5, 2017 PSG needed only three minutes to test the reflexes of Sven Ulreich in the Bayern goal, Mbappe denied at the near post after a fine ball from Marco Verratti. But, against the run of play having sat deep for much of the early exchanges, Bayern took the lead five minutes later.James Rodriguez’s left-wing cross was headed forward by Coman and, though PSG stopped awaiting the offside flag, it was not forthcoming and Lewandowski – being played on by Dani Alves – swept into the bottom-right corner.Bayern grew in ambition as they pressed for a second goal but the direct running and pace of Mbappe and Neymar caused them problems, the latter forcing Ulreich to turn the ball behind after he was played in by the former Monaco teenager.And Bayern punished PSG for Neymar’s profligacy eight minutes before half-time as Tolisso rose to thump a James delivery into the bottom-left corner.PSG’s response was strong as Neymar provided more work for Ulreich with a low shot that he could only parry, but his save from Julian Draxler’s sweetly struck long-range effort was more comfortable.Ulreich could do little when PSG did pull one back through Mbappe’s fourth of the competition.10 – At 18 years & 11 months, Kylian Mbappe is now the youngest player to reach 10 goals in the Champions League (in only 15 games). Wonderkid. pic.twitter.com/iLzlqqT25G — OptaJean (@OptaJean) December 5, 2017 Unsurprisingly Verratti was the creative fulcrum, his lofted pass beautifully controlled by Cavani, who chipped up for Mbappe to nod beyond Ulreich.Unai Emery’s men ramped up the pressure in their bid to complete the comeback. Ulreich was unmoved as he denied Draxler after the Germany international exchanged passes with Neymar, but he soon had to fly to his left to keep out a rasping Mbappe half-volley. Cavani was furious not to be awarded a penalty after he was sent tumbling in the box by a David Alaba challenge and PSG’s indignation was soon furthered when Coman raced down the left and slipped the ball into the path of Tolisso to restore Bayern’s measure of command.More concern for Emery came when Silva limped off having earlier received treatment and was replaced by Presnel Kimpembe.Mbappe saw an effort deflected over and was brilliantly denied by Ulreich in stoppage time but PSG never really threatened what would have been a remarkable late revival.And, with this defeat coming on the heels of a stunning 2-1 loss to Strasbourg in Ligue 1, Emery will know there is plenty of work to be done if PSG are to achieve their lofty goal of European glory. read morelast_img read more

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Liverpool agree record deal to sign Naby Keïta from RB Leipzig next summer

first_imgRB Leipzig Topics Liverpool are expected to test that resolve before the deadline with an offer of around £60m, with the Belgium striker Divock Origi potentially heading in the opposite direction. The club also retain interest in Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, who would be an alternative to Lemar, despite Chelsea agreeing a £35m deal with Arsenal. Virgil van Dijk is another target although Southampton have given no indication they are prepared to sell the defender despite his determination to leave St Mary’s.Dejan Lovren, whose role would be threatened by Van Dijk’s arrival, believes Liverpool showed they are stronger than Arsenal in every department – the substitutes’ bench included – when dismantling Wenger’s side 4-0 at Anfield on Sunday.The central defender said: “We knew this wasn’t Crystal Palace or Hoffenheim coming here, it was Arsenal. They have a lot of quality but we showed that in every position we are stronger than them and it was a deserved win. I don’t even remember them having a shot – that just shows what a great effort it was from everyone, a real team performance.“It’s not just the starting XI, look at the bench. [Daniel] Sturridge came on and scored within a couple of minutes. That says a lot about the strength we have. We’ve got Adam [Lallana] and Philippe [Coutinho] to come back hopefully soon, so let’s see what we can achieve.”Leicester City have made an inquiry about Liverpool’s defender Mamadou Sakho, who is also wanted by Palace and West Bromwich Albion. European club football Liverpool Share via Email Keïta, Jürgen Klopp’s prime midfield target for this summer, underwent a medical in England on Monday after Liverpool finally reached an agreement with Leipzig over the terms of his transfer. Liverpool are to activate the £48m release clause in the midfielder’s contract – a clause that comes into effect at the end of this season – and will also pay a premium to secure the deal now.Barcelona have been among the clubs linked with the Guinea international and Liverpool have moved to ensure Klopp will eventually get his man. Leipzig have steadfastly refused to consider selling Keïta in this transfer window but have accepted a deal that will allow them to retain the player for their debut Champions League season while earning more than his eventual release clause.The 22-year-old, who had a medical in Wilmslow and later finalised terms at Melwood, will officially become a Liverpool player on 1 July, 2018. He is believed to have agreed a five-year contract.Liverpool hope to follow the Keïta breakthrough by adding Lemar to their squad, although they have yet to make a bid for the 21-year-old. Arsenal have been long-term admirers of the France international but, having been told by Monaco that the versatile forward would not be sold this summer, Arsène Wenger declared their interest “dead” last week.That has not deterred Anfield officials from exploring the possibility of bringing Lemar to Merseyside. Liverpool have made inquiries with Monaco who, having sold Bernardo Silva, Tiémoué Bakayoko, Benjamin Mendy and agreed Kylian Mbappé’s departure for Paris Saint‑Germain this summer, wish to keep Lemar in the hope of attracting a higher price next year. Share on Messenger Transfer window news Share on WhatsApp Monacocenter_img Reuse this content Transfer liveblog: Oxlade-Chamberlain to Chelsea, Keïta has Liverpool medical – as it happened Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Read more Liverpool have agreed a club-record deal to sign Naby Keïta from RB Leipzig next summer and they also want to prise Thomas Lemar from Monaco before the transfer deadline on Thursday. Read more The Fiver: the Guardian’s take on the world of football Share on Facebook Share on Pinterestlast_img read more

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Socceroos dealt major blow as Tim Cahill limps out of A-League clash

first_imgnews Share via Email Reuse this content Australia Tim Cahill World Cup 2018 qualifiers Read more A-League Share on Messenger Share on Twitter Australia sportcenter_img It remains to be seen whether the 37-year-old, picked as one of Ange Postecoglou’s 25-man squad for the World Cup qualifiers, will be fit for the national team. The veteran forward didn’t stay to see out the match, travelling to hospital for an MRI on his right ankle.He is due to fly to Honduras on the weekend ahead of the first leg on Friday 10 November (Saturday 11 November AEDT) in San Pedro Sula.Without a clean bill of health he won’t be travelling, and could be either saved for the home leg in Sydney on Wednesday November 15 – or left out completely.Fox Sports reported Cahill would be in “serious doubt” to travel after Cahill’s ankle “blew up significantly” in the change rooms. Cahill was seen putting weight on his ankle, walking and even jumping on the spot in an inspection for City medical staff.Luke Wilkshire’s first A-League goal gave the Sky Blues a 1-0 win to put Graham Arnold’s side on top of the competition for the first time this season.City coach Warren Joyce decided to throw Cahill in for his first start of the season against the title-holders, looking to build on his side’s perfect start to the A-League campaign. But City’s gain turned into Australian football’s pain on the quarter-hour mark.Cahill landed awkwardly as he attempted to hurdle Sydney FC’s Jordi Buijs after a challenge. Five minutes later, he collapsed on the pitch, signalling to the City bench that his night was over.Postecoglou and Australia fans will eagerly await the outcome of Cahill’s scans ahead of the intercontinental playoff. The striker netted a double in last month’s second leg against Syria to ensure Australia qualified from the Asian playoff. Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn David Squires on … another week of Australian football eating itself Share on Pinterest Melbourne City Socceroos star Tim Cahill was sent to hospital and is in doubt for Australia’s win-or-bust World Cup qualifiers with Honduras after limping out of Melbourne City’s A-League match on Friday night.Cahill hurt his ankle in a clash with Sydney FC’s Jordi Buijs at AAMI Park and was substituted just 25 minutes into the match. Australia’s all-time leading scorer cast a forlorn figure as he struggled off the pitch and down the tunnel. Topics Share on WhatsApplast_img read more

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Frank Nouble: ‘They are using weapons instead of using their brains’

first_img Newport County forward Nouble celebrates scoring earlier this season. Photograph: Simon Davies/ProSports/REX/Shutterstock Read more Pinterest Football Share on Messenger Share on LinkedIn Newport County Facebook “No matter how talented they were, no one has made it at Chelsea. It’s up to you to make it happen for yourself,” he says. “I’ve travelled a lot. From the outside, people might see that many clubs and think I’m not good enough but it’s just the way things have worked out.“I’m enjoying it here and we’ll see what happens. I’m settled but football can change any time so I will just have to make the right decision for me and my family.” features “This knife and gun crime recently in London GOTTA STOP!” he wrote. “I lost a close friend to this innocent person in cross fire… life itself is hard already got one chance at it. We must encourage each other to do and be better. Kids out here need the guidance. Life can be great if we live it.”Two more murders the following day took the number of people killed on London’s streets this year to above 50, prompting last week’s summit when the London mayor, Sadiq Khan, met the home secretary, Amber Rudd, and the Metropolitan police commissioner, Cressida Dick, to discuss how to tackle the surge in serious crime. But Nouble, who grew up in Deptford, believes that the police need more support from society at large.“Stop and search is one thing but they need to work harder to prevent these attacks,” he says. “We need to see more patrols in the areas where this is happening. Everyone just seems to think they can get away with it.“When I was younger, you would be scared to even think about carrying something because we were always told you are more likely to get attacked if you have a weapon. But that mentality has changed.“People are using anything as a weapon these days, so it’s difficult to say what should be done,” Nouble adds. “The younger generation has a different mentality but I don’t think that is entirely their fault. When I was younger, there was a lot more community things going on and less technology. If you wanted to see your mate you would have to go and knock for him at his house whereas now everything is online. The first thing they look for is their phone, but for me and my friends it was our football.“Kids aren’t doing what they should be doing – I’ve got a younger brother who is 11 and he is on his phone and PlayStation more than I have ever been. It prevents them from using their own minds – they are using weapons instead of using their brains.”Remarkably, Nouble is not the only member of Newport’s squad to have lost someone they know to the violence. The forward Marlon Jackson was friends with Abraham Badru – a 26-year-old who played for Bristol amateur side Almondsbury and was shot dead in Dalston last week.“Nowadays it seems to happen so much more – someone gets killed and 10 days later you have forgotten their name,” says Nouble. “The media should be talking about it more and trying to get the public to help. Rather than everyone just saying how terrible it is and then moving on to the next story, we need to try to find a solution.”Having joined Newport on a one-year contract last summer, Nouble faces a big decision: whether to remain at the League Two club next season or continue on his nomadic path. The season he spent with Tianjin Quanjian in 2014-15 remains by far the most exotic destination he has chosen so far since rejecting Chelsea’s offer of a professional contract and joining West Ham at the age of 17 because he was concerned about his prospects of playing first-team football. Topics Killed in 2018: London’s victims of violence Share on Facebook “The last time I saw Rio was a few weeks before in the summer when I went to play at the Damilola Taylor centre in Peckham,” says Frank Nouble. “Everyone who we used to play with was there – John Bostock, Mustapha Carayol, Daniel Johnson and a few others who went on to make it as pros. He came over before the game and gave me a Ribena because that’s the type of person that he was. A couple of days later, I heard what had happened.”Nearly eight years since the promising young striker Rio McFarlane was killed after being caught in the crossfire between two feuding gangs in south London, the latest outbreak of violence on the capital’s streets brought the bad memories rushing back for the Newport County forward Nouble. A member of the Aspire football academy, the 18-year-old McFarlane had already turned out for Dulwich Hamlet and was tipped to follow in the footsteps of his talented school friends, many of whom – like Nouble – have gone on to enjoy lengthy professional careers. Share via Email Nowadays it seems to happen so much more – someone gets killed and 10 days later you have forgotten their nameFrank Nouble Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest Twitter Instead, a single gunshot fired from a submachine gun struck McFarlane in the chest and he died two hours later after paramedics failed to resuscitate him. Rio Ferdinand, who had grown up on the same streets and was a friend of McFarlane’s older brother Anthony, was among those to appeal for information to find his killer. Leon Pacquette was eventually sentenced to 35 years in prison for his murder in 2014.“He was in the wrong place at the wrong time,” says Nouble. “When I got the news I had a game the next day for West Ham’s reserves. It was a real shock to the system because we were all so close. He epitomised the friendship that we all had – everyone just wanted to play football. After that, we all stayed at home because nobody wanted to get caught in the crossfire.”Nouble, 26, has racked up almost 200 league appearances since he was a highly rated prospect in Chelsea’s youth academy. His career has taken him to all four of England’s professional leagues and a shortlived stint in China. Now settled in south Wales at his 17th club – including loans – it was the murder of the teenager Tanesha Melbourne-Blake in Tottenham last week that prompted him to speak out on Twitter. Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Rise of David Brooks shows big clubs that less really can be more

first_imgfeatures Share on Messenger The general feeling seems to be, even among those who should know better, that genuine quality starts at around £25m and that anything substantially cheaper is a risk. This is what happens when clubs have too much money. The easy option is to keep handing it over, in the agent-fed belief that there are very few players out there who will improve a good side.Yet for every Virgil van Dijk there is a Romelu Lukaku, a Sánchez or a Pogba, and for every expensive misfit there is a relative unknown who can do the job from day one. Leicester ended up making a £59.6m profit on Mahrez, recouping their modest outlay more than a hundredfold. Bournemouth are not looking to recoup anything at the moment. They are simply sitting pretty because they have a recruitment team capable of recognising potential and a manager willing to trial a young prospect from the Championship.Brooks should count himself lucky, because at a time when young English talent is looking to the Bundesliga, what Bournemouth are able to offer is becoming quite rare. Sportblog Bournemouth have been one of the stories of the season and one of the stories behind the Cherries’ rise to sixth place in the table has been David Brooks’ almost instantly establishing himself as a Premier League performer.The Warrington-born midfielder is a big Manchester United fan, despite starting his football career in Manchester City’s academy, and when José Mourinho and his players pitch up at the Vitality Stadium for Saturday’s early kick-off, Brooks will get a bigger thrill than most from the fact Bournemouth are currently three points and two places better off than their illustrious visitors. Manchester United Topics How well has José Mourinho spent money at Manchester United? Andy Robertson reached the Champions League final with Liverpool last season and has become Scotland captain since joining the club. Photograph: Andrew Powell/Liverpool FC via Getty Images Share via Email The Fiver: sign up and get our daily football email. Steve Cook drives Bournemouth past Norwich into quarter-finals Not too many people had heard of Brooks before this season, though they probably ought to have for, when England Under-20s won the Toulon tournament last year, he was named the event’s best player. He was playing for Sheffield United at the time and flying so low beneath the radar that Eddie Howe was able to pick him up this summer for £10m, rising to, wait for it, £11.5m.That money is not exactly peanuts but for a 20-year-old home-produced player with an international pedigree (Brooks has since turned 21) it is the nearest thing you will find to a bargain in the absurdly over-priced marketplace of English football.Talking of English football, and international pedigree, Brooks now plays for Wales and his decision to opt for the country of his mother’s birth after trying out for both nations at junior level may yet become a source of regret to England managers of the future. Chris Coleman, significantly, called him up for a Welsh friendly while he was still in Sheffield.Despite his slender build and impossibly youthful appearance, Brooks was making a name for himself, even when spending a handful of games, Jamie Vardy-style, on loan to Halifax. So if Bournemouth have ended up with one of the steals of the season, it is tempting to wonder why no one else thought of doing the same.Not Manchester City, obviously, because they had Brooks in the first place and they have so much talent crammed into their first-team squad that Phil Foden is struggling for game time and Jadon Sancho has left for Germany. Perhaps not Chelsea or Liverpool, for similar reasons. But how about Everton, who have picked up a few decent Welsh players over the years? Or Manchester United, the club Brooks supports, the one with a long-standing tradition of sourcing and encouraging local youngsters? Share on WhatsApp Bournemouth probably have a unique advantage here, because they can take a player like Brooks and put him into the team without worrying too much about which established international and his agent are going to be upset by being left out. The player can then sink or swim according to his ability and aptitude, which is sort of old-fashioned but probably how it should be.Brooks is definitely swimming and not sinking at Bournemouth. “There hasn’t been a bedding-in period,” Howe said admiringly a few days ago. “David fits well into the team and he has got better as the season has gone on. He suits our style of play and, when we first scouted him at Sheffield, we thought we saw enough to suggest he could be outstanding in the Premier League.”This might just be the most uplifting story since Liverpool took a chance on Andy Robertson from Hull City, who then seized his own chance and turned himself from a squad signing into a consistently excellent first-team regular. It also brings to mind Arsène Wenger’s comment after Leicester had signed Riyad Mahrez for £400,000 and turned him into a title winner. The then Arsenal manager said he would have been mocked, presumably by board and fans alike, had he produced an unknown from French football costing so little. He would at the very least have been accused of parsimony and lack of grand ambition. Bournemouth Facebook Twitter Share on Facebook Reuse this content Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn This is not to suggest that United presently have a hole for an attacking midfielder that needs filling, though they must have thought so when they recruited Alexis Sánchez on such spectacular wages a little less than a year ago. United also have Paul Pogba, Fred and Juan Mata jostling for midfield places at the moment, not to mention their own Warrington-born product in Jesse Lingard, so there is no pressing reason to be scouring the country for promising prospects that might be available quite cheaply.The question is more a rhetorical one. Would United be interested in a promising 20-year-old at £10m, or would they rather have a marquee name, or record-breaking capture, that would then incur Mourinho’s sarcasm by finding it hard to settle into the side? Share on Pinterest Pinterest Read more Read morelast_img read more

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MLB looks at claims Mariners management called Latino players ‘lazy and stupid’

first_imgMajor League Baseball is investigating claims made against the Seattle Mariners by the team’s recently fired training and conditioning director, who said team management had disparaged Latino players.The Mariners denied the allegations in a statement on Monday following Twitter and Instagram posts from Lorena Martin in which she claimed general manager Jerry Dipoto, manager Scott Servais and director of player development Andy McKay had called Latino players “lazy, dumb and stupid, especially the Dominicans.” Lorena Martin (@LMHighPerform)The Mariners organization has issues. The things I’ve witnessed first hand have left me shocked, GM Jerry Dipoto, Manager Scott Servais, and Director of PD Andy McKay speak about players like thisCalling LATINOS, LAZY, DUMB, and STUPID, especially DOMINICANS#discrimination pic.twitter.com/ie5uxyxq15November 12, 2018 The Mariners said Martin, who was hired last year, was relieved of her duties in October. “While it is our policy to not comment on personnel issues, we do feel it is important to respond to the outrageous, false claims made by her today on social media. And to note that Martin did not make any of these false allegations until after she was relieved of her duties,” the Mariners said in a statement. “The Mariners categorically deny that any member of our management or coaching staff made racist remarks regarding any of our players or staff. Additionally, we have not terminated (or threatened to terminate) any trainers during the offseason.”In her posts, Martin called Dipoto a “poor leader” and said the Mariners would not make the playoffs with the current leadership structure. She said her posts were “a glimpse of what I’ve experienced.” In a later comment on Twitter, Martin said there was a breach of contract by the Mariners and she had reported “discriminatory incidences” to human resources and other staff members during the season.“MLB is aware of the allegations made by a former employee of the Seattle Mariners regarding the conduct of club employees. Consistent with our policies, we are investigating the allegations,” the commissioner’s office said in a statement Tuesday. Martin was hired by the Mariners to oversee their entire training and conditioning program. The Mariners created the role for Martin in the hope she could improve the organization’s training practices and help prevent injuries. She had come to Seattle after serving as the director of sports performance analytics for the Los Angeles Lakers. MLB … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay. Whether we are up close or further away, the Guardian brings our readers a global perspective on the most critical issues of our lifetimes – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. We believe complex stories need context in order for us to truly understand them. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Support The Guardian Share on Facebook Baseball Seattle Mariners Share on Messenger Share via Emailcenter_img Since you’re here… news Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Share on Pinterest US sports Topics Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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‘What she says goes’: meet the woman in charge of a men’s team

first_imgWomen’s football Clàudia Pina celebrates after scoring one of her two goals that won Spain the Under-17 World Cup final. Photograph: Buda Mendes/Fifa via Getty Images Sportblog Facebook Natasha Orchard-Smith says: ‘There’s no reasons why anyone couldn’t do it. You’ve just got to be given the opportunity.’ Photograph: Lydia Goldsmith/Arlesey Town “We sat down and thought it would be brilliant. Men’s football goes one way completely. Men’s football: male coaches. Nah, let’s forget this. Natasha is intelligent, she’s detailed, she’s technical. I played semi-pro for 20-plus years and she’s got to be one of the best coaches I’ve come across. We said: ‘Let’s do this. Let’s bring a female in.’”They knew it was unusual. They just did not realise how unusual. The FA has confirmed that Orchard-Smith is the only female head coach from the National League down.“There’s no reasons why anyone couldn’t do it,” says Orchard-Smith. “You’ve just got to be given the opportunity.”Now they know how rare their decision was, they are hoping it will help others take the same step. “We’re hoping that other managers in non-league and maybe pro look at it and go: ‘They hired a female coach, what’s wrong with that? Why can’t we do it?’” says Endersby. “Some of these women coaches coming through are so good and they just need to be given a chance.”Has it changed the club? “The dynamic has changed, the crowd is different, the management in the other dugout don’t know what to do. There’s more respect. The players here have absolutely warmed to her, they’ve got respect for her. What she says goes. No one ever questions it and, to be honest, if they did, they aren’t the right player for my and James’ team.” Topics But success on the pitch is not the be all and end all for Endersby and Hatch. “We can see the long-term goal. What this can do for female footballers and women in football. There are probably 10 other Natasha’s sitting round the country going, ‘You know what, if she can do it, I can do it.’“It takes one person to break the mould. I think it’s great for women’s football and I think it’s great for men’s football. We’ve landed on gold. She’s Uefa B. We want to go higher in the game, me and James, and we’ve always said we’d like to bring her with us. We now joke that it’ll be us trying to go up with her.”Talking points• Uefa have announced that the Football Association has been successful in its bid to host the 2021 European Championship – very much a formality as England were the only bidders. The final will be held at Wembley, with eight other venues listed as part of the bid, including Brighton & Hove Albion’s Amex Arena and Southampton’s St Mary’s. Pinterest Twitter Twitter Facebook Pinterest Share on LinkedIn The 100 best female footballers in the world 2018center_img features • Clàudia Pina’s first-half double secured the Under-17 World Cup for Spain in a 2-1 win against Mexico. Denise Castro reduced the deficit in Uruguay but Mexico failed to find the leveller. Pina finished joint top scorer with Ghana’s Mukarama Abdulai on seven goals.• The draw for next summer’s World Cup in France takes place on Saturday and will be aired live on BBC2. England are in Pot 1 with France, USA, Germany, Australia and Canada. Scotland are in Pot 3.• Manchester United’s assistant manager Willie Kirk has left the club after four months to take the helm at Everton. The former Bristol City and Hibernian manager led the club to their first win of the season against Liverpool in his first match.• The next round of the Continental League Cup kicks off on Wednesday evening. Highlights include a second Merseyside derby in four days, Manchester United hosting Durham – the only side to have taken points off of Casey Stoney’s side – and Brighton & Hove Albion v Crystal Palace. You see men going into women’s football; the door should be open for women to come into men’s. It sounds sort of obvious. So why is it so rare?Two former semi-pro players, Matt Endersby and James Hatch, took charge of the Bedfordshire club Arlesey Town, in the ninth tier of English football, at the start of June. Following relegation there were no players, they had no coaching staff and they had very little time to settle in. The first thing they needed to do was find a head coach and they phoned Natasha Orchard-Smith.For them it was obvious. They knew Orchard-Smith. “When I was coaching at Barton she was stood behind the dugout one day,” says Endersby. “I was listening to everything she was saying and I was like: ‘Who is this woman? This information she’s coming out with is spot on.’ Orchard-Smith is a remarkably experienced coach. As a player “not playing at a very high level” she was encouraged to do her FA Level 1 badge by a friend.“I did it and then didn’t really do anything with it,” she says. “But when my lad got to about seven and started to show an interest in football I took him to a local club and then kind of became part of the club. They needed a manager, under-eights, and because I had done my Level 1 they were like: ‘Yep, bang, thank you, we’ll have you.’ I did that for 10 years, under-eights to under-18s.”She completed her Level 2 and Uefa B licences, her goalkeeping Level 2, has worked as an FA skills coach in Bedfordshire, has her own coaching business, a degree in coaching for performance from Anglia Ruskin and is currently undertaking her goalkeeping Uefa B.But when her son reached 18 and shifted his focus from football, she thought she would have a step back and reclaim her evenings and weekends. Then Arsenal approached her and she started working with their under-10 girls in their Regional Talent Centre. She had been there for 14 months and was lined up to be there this season – but then Endersby called to offer a bit of an alien project.“I wasn’t sure because I hadn’t worked in the men’s game before, I’d mainly worked 5-11s and youth/grassroots. Which is completely different to semi-pro,” says Orchard-Smith. “I went in and I’ve never really looked back. It’s very different but I’ve loved every minute of it. I think I’ve been very lucky, the lads have taken to me from the moment I came in. Ones that moved from other clubs, they knew I was already there. They’ve been very receptive.”It was a big learning curve. Having always been in development, switching to success-reliant football took time to adjust, but to say she has flourished is an understatement. The team are fourth in the Spartan South Midlands League Premier Division with 12 wins from 17 and sit six points off the top.“I’m ecstatic because sometimes it takes two to three years for a team to build. We are doing really, really well,” says Endersby. The Fiver: sign up and get our daily football email. Share on Pinterest Share on Twitter Read more Share on WhatsApp Share on Facebook Share via Email Share on Messenger Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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Read, think and avoid cliches: tips for children aiming to be sportswriters

first_img Twitter The best writing is clear writing. There are tricks to writing clearly. One is to write in short sentences. Another is always to use simple language. Even if the ideas are complicated, keep the language simple.5) Don’t repeat! features Share on LinkedIn The Guardian and Football School launch Young Sportswriter competition 6) Add context!Include relevant background. For example, if you are writing about a football match it is important to tell the reader what sort of match it is: is it a cup final, a relegation battle or a derby between your school and your rivals down the road?7) Don’t assume! 2) Think! If you are going to write about a match, choose an exciting one. If you are going to write about a person, choose someone you find fascinating. It sounds obvious but if you are not interested in the match or the person you will probably struggle to make the story interesting.3) Plan! Football Facebook You probably do this anyway, but spend time reading about sport, whether online, in newspapers and magazines, or in books. Not only will you learn lots of fascinating facts but you will also develop an understanding of how sports articles are written. In a match report, for example, you need to mention the result towards the beginning. The reader wants to know who won straight away. Share on Messenger Share on Facebook If you love sport then you have what it takes to enter the Football School/Guardian Young Sportswriter competition. You’re halfway there! In all writing, passion and enthusiasm for the subject matter is key. Here are 10 top tips that will help you develop into the best writer you can be.1) Read! You may be very well-informed about a team or a person but do not assume your reader is. For example, if you refer to a team’s “famous victory” you need to spell out what that victory was. You cannot assume the person reading the story will know what you are referring to unless you state it clearly.8) Avoid jargon!Jargon means language only a specialist will understand, such as “the low block”, a phrase used by coaches to describe teams who keep their defenders near their goal. Make sure every word you use would be understandable to a classmate who does not share the same interests as you.9) Avoid cliches!center_img Share on Twitter Harry Kane shoots at goal … but there are plenty of words you can use that are more descriptive. Photograph: Mike Hewitt/Getty Images Pinterest Share via Email Topics Reuse this content A cliche is a phrase that is overused, like “cool as a cucumber”, or “110%”. Cliches make the text feel predictable and boring. If you want to describe a player as happy, avoid “over the moon” and if you want to describe someone as sad, avoid tired phrases like “sick as a parrot”.10) Have a conclusion!It is always nice to end a piece of text with either a summary of what has come before or a final thought. Read more Share on Pinterest List the facts you want to have in your story and sketch out a structure. The best pieces of writing have a beginning, a middle and an end. If you are stuck on how to start the story that is fine. You can start writing the story in the middle and write the beginning later.4) Be clear! Share on WhatsApp We said don’t repeat! Avoid repeating the same words, since this will make your text boring to read. In football, for example, players are always kicking the ball, but rather than use the word “kick” all the time you could use a more descriptive word like curl, slot, fire, poke or hook.last_img read more

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Andy Murray to make Queen’s doubles comeback against world’s best

first_imgRarely can a doubles draw have attracted so much interest as the one at the Queen’s Club in London on Saturday and, when the balls of fate dropped, Andy Murray and Feliciano López were matched against the best team in the world, Juan Sebastián Cabal and Robert Farah. They more than likely will play on Wednesday.The Colombian hotshots won in Barcelona and Rome, reached the semi-finals at Roland Garros and are leading the race to London for the ATP World Tour Finals. It will not be a quiet hit in the park for Murray who is returning to the game after four months out, recovering from his second hip surgery. After Queen’s, Murray wants to further explore the state of his recovery by playing in Eastbourne before contemplating a return to Wimbledon, although it is uncertain if López will be able to accompany him, given he is unsure if he has to qualify for the singles there. The All England Club could cooperate by giving the Spaniard a wildcard, even though Murray says he will happily play with any of a few non-specialists he has spoken to about doubles. Andy Murray Boris Becker: we should question the quality and attitude of under-28 men Support The Guardian 1:10 Read more Share on LinkedIn Marin Cilic Read more Share on Twitter Watching Murray and López work out at Queen’s this week was the defending Fever-Tree tournament singles champion, Marin Cilic, and he had words of encouragement and caution for the Scot. “He was hitting with Feliciano, just practising,” the Croat said. “I was watching from over two courts away.“He was hitting incredibly cleanly and really well. I didn’t see much moving. The question is always with the movement, especially on grass, a little bit difficult. But if he’s in the tournament, he definitely must feel OK.”Cilic, struggling with form this summer and who will have problems of his own in the first round against the fast-rising Chilean Cristian Garín, added: “I was talking a little bit with him at the Australian Open [where Murray last played, losing in the first round in five tough sets against Roberto Bautista Agut] and wishing him all the best for his recovery, hoping to see him back as quickly as possible.“He’s been an incredible figure for our sport for so many years, especially here in England. It’s incredible to see him back. I’m just hoping his recovery is going to go even better and better and that he’s going to be feeling really well. Hopefully, he will also continue to play at a high level.”Hope is in the air, then. What Murray will not know until he gets into the contest is how his rebuilt body will react to the unscripted pressure of match conditions on a surface that can be hazardous if damp. The forecast is good for the first few days of the week, so the surface should have calmed down by midweek.Juan Martín del Potro, who plays the young Canadian Denis Shapovalov in the first round, says Murray “has nothing to lose”. The Argentinian, who knows more about injuries than your local A&E department, said: “If he plays a tennis match without pain, it will be even bigger than winning a tournament.” Since you’re here… Topics Share on Messenger Share via Email The Observer Play Video Nick Kyrgios The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage If the chosen player were to be Nick Kyrgios, they would pack any court on which they appeared, perhaps for not all the right reasons. The Australian refused this week to row back on recent attacks on “cringeworthy” Novak Djokovic and “super-salty” Rafael Nadal. “A couple of people have loved it actually,” he said at the Surbiton tournament. “I’m not going to mention names but, regardless if people like it or don’t like it, they were just my honest thoughts.”Kyrgios, whose motivation dips and soars like a hawk, plays France’s Adrian Mannarino in the first round, in the same quarter as the first seed, Stefanos Tsitsipas, who has drawn the British No 1, Kyle Edmund. Dan Evans, who has been in sparkling form, will need to be at his best in his opening match against Stan Wawrinka. Share on Pinterest Tennis Share on WhatsApp ‘Pain-free’ Andy Murray hopes to return to singles tennis – video Share on Facebook news … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Reuse this contentlast_img read more

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